Crow Country

  • Title: Crow Country
  • Author: Kate Constable
  • ISBN: 9781742373959
  • Page: 197
  • Format: Paperback
  • Crow Country From the author of the Chanters of Tremaris series comes a contemporary time travel fantasy grounded in the landscape of Australia Beginning and ending always the same always now The game the stor
    From the author of the Chanters of Tremaris series comes a contemporary time travel fantasy, grounded in the landscape of Australia Beginning and ending, always the same, always now The game, the story, the riddle, hiding and seeking Crow comes from this place this place comes from Crow And Crow has work for you.Sadie isn t thrilled when her mother drags her from theFrom the author of the Chanters of Tremaris series comes a contemporary time travel fantasy, grounded in the landscape of Australia Beginning and ending, always the same, always now The game, the story, the riddle, hiding and seeking Crow comes from this place this place comes from Crow And Crow has work for you.Sadie isn t thrilled when her mother drags her from the city to live in the country town of Boort But soon she starts making connections with the country, with the past, with two boys, Lachie and Walter, and, most surprisingly, with the ever present crows When Sadie is tumbled back in time to view a terrible crime, she is pulled into a strange mystery Can Sadie, Walter, and Lachie figure out a way to right old wrongs, or will they be condemned to repeat them A fantasy ground in mythology, this novel has the backing of a full consultative process on the use of indigenous lore.

    • Crow Country BY Kate Constable
      197 Kate Constable
    • thumbnail Title: Crow Country BY Kate Constable
      Posted by:Kate Constable
      Published :2019-07-11T14:57:28+00:00

    About Kate Constable


    1. Kate Constable was born in Sangringham, Melborne Victoria, Australia When she was six years old, her family moved to Papua New Guinea where her father worked as a pilot Constable got her Arts Law degree at Melborne University, then got a job at Warner Music She started writing during these years She wrote several short stories before becoming an author and after her first attempt at writing a novel she fell in love with the man that is now her husband They have a daughter.Constable s first official novel was The Singer of All Songs, in a trilogy called The Chanters of Tremaris It was published in 2002, a few weeks after Constable s daughter was born.


    541 Comments


    1. Originally posted on The Book SmugglersSo today I was supposed to be reviewing The Stillness of Time Travel a self-published novel by A.J. Maddicott. I learnt about the book at Foyles (The Best Indie Bookstore in the UK), which is one of the few bricks and mortar bookstores to sell the book because they love it so much. I had to buy it there and then and the book had been sitting on my TBR for a while until I decided it was about time to read it. And the premise is pretty cool: young boy learns [...]

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    2. Similar to the 2007 film The Messengers, this book uses crows as a symbol and features a young girl thrown into chaos during a move from one place to another. In this rapid and initially unwelcomed switch of scenery, she finds friendship, adventure and wonderful memories.

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    3. I absolutely loved this book. I've only read Kate Constable's Tremaris series which is one of my absolute favourite fantasy series of all times - right up there with Le Guin, Nix, Pullman - so I shouldn't be at all surprised that I loved this book.The story weaves together three stories from 3 generations and spans indigenous and non-indigenous themes. When Sadie's mother Ellie decides to move from the city to Boort, a small country town in northern Victoria, Sadie is not impressed. Boort is 'pa [...]

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    4. Hmm I was sure I'd reviewed this book several years back. But I couldn't find the review anywhere. So I decided to have another read of it to refresh my memory. Serendipitous choice - as the day after I started, I was able to offer a friend some significant info based on the contents of the book.Ok, it's a timeslip adventure. Reminds me, just a little, of Rosanne Hawke's The Messenger Bird for that reason. Though this is a book with a detached floaty feeling. In keeping with the character of Sad [...]

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    5. Lyn is a judge for the Aurealis Awards. This review is the personal opinion of Lyn herself, and does not necessarily reflect the opinion of any judging panel, the judging coordinator or the Aurealis Awards management team. I picked it up, I put it down. I read something else. Rinse, repeat. I'm aware I should really love this because so far it really feels like the first true Australian book, but I don't. I just can't engage with it at all. I gave it high marks for its originality and its world [...]

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    6. A fantastic story! The first few pages had me worried, but it only got better from there. A fast-paced book that draws on Aboriginal tales of Waa the Crow and creates a other-worldly and at times spooky story that jumps between present day and 1933. Many great themes to discuss with students: reconciliation, equal rights, drought, heritage etc.I am very impressed with Crow Country and look forward to sharing it with grade five and six students.

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    7. Just finished this bit of holiday reading and I give it two thumbs up. A great book that explores the idea that the Dreaming of indigenous Australians' isn't just in the past but part of the present and future. Kate Constable has created believable young characters who are considering the importance of their own stories, how they're intertwined with the stories of people in their past and present and the power they have to create their own stories by making choices based in honesty and integrity [...]

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    8. I'm still in two minds about this book. One the one hand it's beautifully written, has good pacing, solid characters, good structure and brings important issues out into the open. The basic storyline - about a teenage girl who moves (against her wishes) to the small country town where her mother grew up - sets up the current racial conflicts, and those unresolved from the past, really well. It is important to note the author liaised with Aboriginal Elders from the country she was writing about, [...]

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    9. This has received very mixed reviews on ; some people love it and give it five stars, other people hate it and give it one. I don't quite understand the people who have described it as 'boring' (I felt like doing that irritating adult thing and saying "only boring people get bored"). I loved the descriptions of Boort and its surrounds, but maybe that's because I spent time up there after the 2011 floods and can picture the area. I found this a good teen time-slip novel, comparable to 'Children o [...]

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    10. Crow country is an okay book. I read it only because I had to, and honestly I didn't like it that much. Firstly, the main character Sadie annoyed me. I found her to be very selfish & childish. Secondly, I still don't see the purpose of the whole book. While reading Crow Country, it builds up to a particular event & I don't see the importance of it. Along with that they never showed us what a particular object was so it's very hard to put together the pieces because this whole book was ab [...]

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    11. I am in such admiration of Kate Constable’s bravery and delicacy in writing this beautiful book, which draws upon Aboriginal mythology and Australian history to deal with themes of injustice, racism, truthfulness and atonement. Crow Country is a simple book, simply told, but that is part of its great strength. It tells the story of Sadie, an unhappy teenager who moves to the country with her flighty but loving mother. One day she stumbles across an Aboriginal sacred site, and a crow speaks to [...]

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    12. I can not describe how much I loved this book and could not put it down. I read it in a few hours which is rare for me. I loved the language used throughout that I would use every day, great to see book continue with common language and slang rather than to smarten itself up (in a way). The text is easy to read and I must comment Kate's description of indigenous culture that has been written with such respect. This text should be studied in schools as it brings forward the importance of the past [...]

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    13. this is the worst book I have ever read!I had to read it for school and I know I was not the only one who found it boring and confusing the story is weird and in some parts she says quite a few rude things about peoples races I love books I do but this was not existing at all. the way Sadie traveled back in time as someone else but knew she was from present day but still thought like someone else was hard to read and had not much of a story line many people complained about this book that after [...]

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    14. “The Dreaming is always; forever it's always happening, and us mob, we're part of it, all the time, everywhere, and every-when too.”Meh. This book should have been in the children's section, not the Young Adult. Can't really think of what else to say about it, it took me about 5 months to read, so I obviously didn't like it that much.

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    15. I really enjoyed this and found I wanted more, I didn't want it to end. The Time Slips were done really well and without confusion. I also felt its very topical in year of the 20th anniversary for Mabo. Looking forward to introducing it in my school library.

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    16. Where crows own the land and people can understand what the crows say. Crow Country is a fascinating look into Aboriginal spirituality. Our Australian indigenous culture is complex and incredibly interesting. This is a compelling read with a theme of wrongs can being made right.

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    17. Very good. A bit scary a times. Very good morel. At times I wondered why the librarians put this book in middle fiction rather than teenage fiction. I LOVED IT!!! :) 5 stars for me*****

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    18. Loved everything about this story, the characters, themes and especially the way the time slip was used to bring the stories together. Upper primary students of our school love it too.

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    19. great book! Go check my blog for my review.

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    20. Great book I suggest anyone can read it.

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    21. A good read and a lovely time slip to the past to solve a mystery. Sadie is a good strong character. Good treatment of aboriginal issues. Great twist at the end.

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    22. Sadie is bloody annoying and the depiction of aboriginal Australians is stereotypical.

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    23. Sadie's father is no longer around, and her mother Ellie moves the two of them back to the town she grew up in. Ellie immediately reunites with her controversial old flame, David, an Indigenous man who has been the subject of racism for many years.The story is about injustice and racism, woven into a powerful Indigenous mythology that has the ability to inflict punishment for wrongs committed. The Crows - because this is Crow country - speak to Sadie and urge her to right the wrongs of her ances [...]

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    24. Evocative time-slip mystery where a small Australian country town is the centre of timeless forces. In the indigenous Dreaming, the Crow has been the messenger and story teller, and though the European-settled landscape literally seems to drown out the Dreaming, the crows and their imperative message still live on: 'Beginning and ending, always the same, always now. The game, the story, the riddle, hiding and seeking. Crow comes from this place; this place comes from Crow. And Crow has work for [...]

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    25. Sadie and her mother Ellie have recently moved back to Ellie’s home town of Boort, and Sadie hates it. Then Sadie is drawn into the Indigenous history of the area by the mysterious Crow, who tells her that this I his land, and she must right the wrongs of the past, committed by her own ancestors. This is a time-slip novel, and Sadie often finds herself passing out at strange moments and transported back into the past. I didn’t really like this novel. I found the depiction of Indigenous cultu [...]

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    26. My 11 yo son was reading this for school and having a lot of trouble understanding it and following the story line so I thought I'd read it to help him out.I'll keep it short and to the point:-Character development is poor.-The time slips are confusing and not well handled.-It uses a style of conversation that, unless you've grown up in or interacted with country Australia is difficult to understand. I don't know how migrant families would follow it.-The way the characters resolve their issues a [...]

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    27. Sadie isn’t happy about moving to a small aussie town her mum used to visit as a child. She has to leave everything behind in the city and she makes sure her mum knows how she feels about it.Soon after arriving, she explores the area and finds a strange circle of stones in a dried up lake bed. To her shock, a crow lands nearby and speaks to her!This is the beginning of a seemingly impossible task set by the crow – to right a wrong. The only trouble is Sadie has no idea what it is. When she b [...]

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    28. Two and a half. Like so many books I end up reading, this is one I grabbed at the library because it looked interesting for one of my kids to read. "Time slip mystery" grabbed my eye, as did the shiny gold award on the cover. But sure enough, I was headed for swim practice with nothing to read, so I grabbed this one (having not been picked up by any of the kids yet). And I went ahead and read the whole thing, mostly just because I didn't have anything else on hand. There was nothing so wrong wit [...]

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    29. I'm an Australian, and I know first hand how frustrating it is seeing everyone trying to 'understand us'. Americans thinking we wrestle crocodiles, and Brits thinking that all of us live in scorching hot desert. Well, thank the heavens, because we finally have a book that truly captures what it is like to live in this beautiful country. Personally, reading this book was like, well, living. I could relate to pretty much every event (talking crows and time-travelling aside). Crow Country is a deli [...]

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