Here Comes Everybody

  • Title: Here Comes Everybody
  • Author: James Fearnley
  • ISBN: 9780571253968
  • Page: 334
  • Format: Paperback
  • Here Comes Everybody Here Comes Everybody The Story of the Pogues by James Fearnley contains all the highs lows successes and excesses in a definitive and honest account of the Pogues and their exuberant frontman Sha
    Here Comes Everybody The Story of the Pogues, by James Fearnley, contains all the highs, lows, successes and excesses, in a definitive and honest account of the Pogues and their exuberant frontman Shane MacGowan One of the best books I ve read so far this year Naturally, Shane MacGowan is the book s focus and fascination, a mixture of personal awfulness and great cHere Comes Everybody The Story of the Pogues, by James Fearnley, contains all the highs, lows, successes and excesses, in a definitive and honest account of the Pogues and their exuberant frontman Shane MacGowan One of the best books I ve read so far this year Naturally, Shane MacGowan is the book s focus and fascination, a mixture of personal awfulness and great charm, but this isn t a biography of Shane though his quote on the front is worth the money alone It s just how I d imagine I d remember it Fearnely also makes sure that this is his book, with great honesty In the end it is the I was there insights that make Here Comes Everybody such a good book not just an essential purchase for Pogues fans, but for anyone interested in the reality of being in a band And what a band David Quantick, Word magazine Fearnley s descriptions of Shane MacGowan, the front man of the Irish folk rock band the Pogues, suppurate with pure deliciousness By 1991, Fearnley had ended up hating the Miss Havisham figure who sat in a darkened hotel room, painting his face silver and refusing to go on stage and yet his memoir is funny and affectionate, a cackling expectoration of a mad decade as part of the band In his own way, MacGowan is the ideal protagonist talented, inspired, and halitotic, but flawed My dreams have featured Shane often than my dad for some time now, writes Fearnely, touchingly Read it, and exhale Camilla Long, Sunday Times Fearnley is brilliant at conjuring the milieu from which the Pogues sprang, a lost, down at heel demimonde of King s Cross squats and housing association flats If he can t or won t tell you why MacGowan s decline occurred, he describes it in harrowing detail the screaming fits, the vomiting, his skin the colour of grout .Fearnley s book fits perfectly with the Pogues for all their earthiness, they were a band concerned with myths, from the Irish legends MacGowan s lyrics relocated to the back streets and pubs of north London to the persistent rock n roll fable of the damned, beautiful loser There s nothing romantic about alcoholic self destruction, as Here Comes Everybody makes clear, but a song as beautiful as A Pair of Brown Eyes can make you believe there is at least while it s playing In the process, MacGowan became a mythic figure himself a myth, despite the unsparing detail that Fearnley ends up burnishing Alexis Petridis If you think all rock music memoirs are a mixture of PR fluff, second hand observations and strategically selected memories, then Here Comes Everybody The Story of The Pogues is the book to make you change your mind That Fearnley hasn t been quarantined for writing such a warts and all tale says much about the band and the bond formed across 30 fractious years A band of brothers to the very end, then, and with a fine, salty memoir to raise a glass to Irish Times An enjoyable and charming read The book whizzes by in a blur of gigs, hits, alcohol fuelled triumphs and disasters Fearnely is especially good on the band s eventful 1985 US tour Like the Pogue s best work, Here Comes Everybody is anything but streamlined and orderly, and its endless twists and turns pack a mightly wallop Sunday Business Post A frank and funny account of wild times and shattered friendships by the folk punk outfit s accordion player, James Fearnely It kicks off as the rest of the group agree to throw out their shambolic frontman Metro

    • Here Comes Everybody - James Fearnley
      334 James Fearnley
    • thumbnail Title: Here Comes Everybody - James Fearnley
      Posted by:James Fearnley
      Published :2019-07-09T14:57:34+00:00

    About James Fearnley


    1. James Fearnley was born in 1954 in Worsley, Manchester He played guitar in various bands including the Nips with Shane MacGowan, before becoming the accordion player in the Pogues James continues to tour with the band and lives in Los Angeles.


    447 Comments


    1. And he wrote us a book of times long goneWell written, astute, honest, and full of great anecdotes and insightful day-to-day details. For a book that is essentially a chronological document of the history of The Pogues, the book was engrossing and always interesting.As with most memoirs, an interest in the subject matter is pretty much essential, however, if you’re reading this, then chances are you feel some affinity to The Pogues. If that’s the case then I confidently assert you should lov [...]

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    2. I love the Pogues and this is a real insight into life in that band and bands in general. Written by accordion player Fearnley, it makes you realise how little of most band's stories you get to hear. THe Pogues were 6-8 different people battling with addictions and illness and fidelity and creativity and Feanley captures the feeling of being one of the cogs in the wheel - not necessarily the most important or glamorous, but a vital cog nonetheless.He's frank and not afraid to reveal his own weak [...]

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    3. Well written story of the Pogues by a man who was there from the beginning!

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    4. It’s the end of August 1991, The Pogues are on tour and have checked into the Pan Pacific Hotel in Yokohama. Shane has gone to his room, everyone is jet lagged. A meeting is called, and it will be about Shane. A long discussion ensues and a decision is reached. Darryl starts by saying, “We’ve been having a talk.” Shane replies, “You’ve all been very patient with me. What took you so long?”In Here Comes Everybody, James Fearnley starts at the end. The rest of The Pogues have decided [...]

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    5. If you are a fan, you will hear every song as Fearnley chronicles the writing, performing, and recording of each. Oh, lamentations -- all my Pogues albums are on cassette. Thank goodness for you tube, but it's not the same as listening to a whole album all the way through.I love that they were from England and not Ireland (though some had Irish roots) and they were, at first, rejected by traditional Irish singers, and later embraced. Their punkish edge made all those songs more enjoyable for me. [...]

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    6. A great read if you are a Pogues fan like me. Great inside stories about the dynamics and friendship between the band members, how it all started, some stories and opinions about other musicians and bands in their orbit. Although I was disappointed there were no stories about meeting Bob Dylan and what he was like even though Dylan asked them to be his opening band on several tour dates. And I must say that even though Fearnley apparently had ambitions to be a great writer before the Pogues got [...]

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    7. Fearnley was the accordionist for the Pogues. Twenty some years later, he has written a book about their heyday. He has done an excellent job, coveying the urgent and the ridiculous and the sublime. I love the Pogues. They are a touchstone for me. And perhaps that makes me a bit biased, as I was eager to embrace the story of their rise and to cringe at some of the awful moments on their way down. Shane MacGowan is one of the true characters of my generation, and Fearnley has the perfect vantage [...]

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    8. An entertaining book about an entertaining band. James Fearnley, it turns out, is as good a writer as he is accordionist. He’s got plenty of mad anecdotes, as you’d expect. And plenty to say about his talented but troubled frontman, Shane MacGowan (not all of it complimentary, which was appreciated). Just one quibble: as well as downing gallons of booze during his time with the Pogues, Fearnley also appears to have swallowed a dictionary. Words like etiolate, contumely and crepitation pepper [...]

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    9. If you're a fan of The Pogues, this is a riveting, fly-on-the-wall account of accordianist James Fearnley's years in the band. The biggest surprise is how well written the book is. Fearnely has a knack for the descriptive that makes for vivid stories of a band ruled by an out-of-control, indifferent and extremely talented drunk. He's unabashedly honest about his own foibles during the band era, as well, and there are times where you the reader burn with his shame. You may learn a lot about Shane [...]

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    10. Interesting read about the history of the Pogues, written by the accordion player. He veers between a nice use of words and overly-ornate prose. He did a good job of telling his story without trashing anyone in a vicious manner, always a plus. Reading this made me determined to avoid live concerts: while the fans are out there having a good time, who knows what is going on within the band and in each member's life? The misery of life on the road and interpersonal struggles was quite depressing.

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    11. Beautiful, funny and heartbreaking. The Pogues have been an utterly unique musical presence over the last 30 years, and their story deserves treatment in keeping with this fact. Fearnley, who lived the story as the band’s multi-instrumentalist, lays it out with bluntness, charm and gorgeously remembered detail.

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    12. As a huge fan of The Pogues, I was ecstatic when given a copy of this as a gift. Fearnley is a talented writer who gives an in-depth account of his time in the band without getting bogged down in unnecessary details. I throughly enjoyed this one.

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    13. Great book but their needs to be an addendum or another edition since much has happened since.

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    14. Beautifully-written and never dull, this is my new favourite music memoir (sorry Viv Albertine!).

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    15. I enjoyed this book! Having been a fan of The Pogues for years, it was great to get some insight from a person that was there to experience it all! If you're a fan then it's a must read!

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    16. OkThis wasn't a bad book but it was pompous in some distinct ways, and read at times like the author had a thesaurus propped up beside him.

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    17. Interesting look at the band. Someone should take away James' thesaurus, though.

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    18. muchas anécdotas desconocidas sobre una de las bandas mas infravaloradas de la historia

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    19. James Fearnley's book is an earnest, personal and at points rather literary account of his decade or more with the Pogues. I really enjoyed it - and I'm not even a huge Pogues fan (I'm probably most indebted to the Pogues for 'White City', which introduced me to its source 'The Curragh of Kildare' - the second song I'll have played at my funeral). As reviewers have said, this is a book about being in a touring band, with all of the dislocation and rootlessness that that involves. It sounds, fran [...]

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    20. Perhaps I am being slightly generous with the stars, but it is an easy and entertaining read.It gives a good description of being in a band, a gang. It is perhaps better at describing the early days, the dirt and the squalor than it is at covering the success. As most of the band, including Fearnley seem to spend much of the time drunk, particularly on tour, it might be because he can't remember the good days that well. For many, including me, the heart of the Pogues was always Shane MacGowan. A [...]

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    21. "Catholic means here comes everybody", according to James Joyce in Finnegans Wake. And that's the best that I can do with the title of this tome as otherwise it's a bit of a mystery misnomer to me.And since I'm here I will give you a bit of trivia:In Rodney Dangerfield's 1986 comedy film Back to School about a wealthy but uneducated father who goes to college to show solidarity with his discouraged son only to learn that he cannot buy an education or happiness I need to tell you that I was laugh [...]

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    22. It took me almost two months to read this book, so a word of advice to readers who are fans of The Pogues (or of what's left of them) and who want to read this biography to see how they became what they were: don't read it without the internet, and don't expect to read it fast. Unless you are an incredibly knowledgeable person in the field of music, there is a 90% chance that you won't know people James Fearnley is talking about in his book (it's no coincidence the book is called "Here Comes Eve [...]

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    23. I am overdue saying something on this book as I read it a couple of weeks back added it to my read pile but time limited me commented further does however deserve commentary.This book is so enjoyable as unlike many autobiography or biographical works this does feel to be based very much in factJames Fearnley uses his vantage point as accordion player from the Pogues to plot their rise and subsequent falling out(in commercial terms the Pogues were still doing O.K. at the end of Macgowans tenure w [...]

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    24. I've been a fan of the Pogues since I was a kid. I have their albums(well, all the ones with Shane) I've tried to watch documentaries about them, I've also read "A Drink with Shane MacGowan" to try and find out as much as I could about them. Finally "Here Comes Everybody" has taken care of my thirst to know all there is to know about the Pogues. Written by their accordion player, he was there before they even formed. With the stories of Shane's drinking, he would be the person that could remembe [...]

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    25. In general, I'm not fond of celeb or band or sports biogs. "We did this; then we went there where that happened; and then he said something; and we went to somewhere else." - for 300 pages, spiced only by the odd caustic remark or tale of illicit sex or drugs. And to some extent, this story of The Pogues, inevitably, has the same flavour.ButBut Fearnley can really write. Sitting a little uncomfortably alongside the narrative are some lyrical descriptive passages, especially when describing aspec [...]

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    26. A masterful account of life in one of the more colourful bands of the last 30 years, Here Comes Everbody is an insight into how a band comes together and then dissolves through the self-destructive personnel involved.James Fearnley, accordion player with The Pogues, describes the ramshackle origins of the band and captures their taciturn defiance at attempts by their manager to introduce a degree of professionalism. Fearnley's droll prose depicts a vivid portrait of each of his colleagues and is [...]

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    27. Although this is interesting and extremely well written, given the usual standard of musicians' autobiographical output, it did start to lose its furious pace in the middle somewhere. By the end it was quite bitty and jumped from episode to episode in a chaotic and fragmented way. I may be missing the point though because it's so well written that I wonder if Fearnley was deliberately mirroring the frantic explosion and ultimate breakdown of the band itself; if he was I apologize. It's a great r [...]

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    28. I raced through it but it got rather painful. Fearnley doesn't really try to make sense of the whole experience, which is fair both for a writer and for a human being who probably doesn't want to cross certain lines, but it does leave some unanswered questions. This review sums up the book's biggest one theguardian/books/2012 - but the Philip Chevron story is in many ways just as puzzling - you feel for him, but it is also kind of a shock that these guys were willing to add Chevron's issues to t [...]

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    29. Here Comes Everybody, The Story of The Pogues by James Fearnley. And what a story it is. I love The Pogues ever since I was an teenager. I worshiped Shane MacGowan and his songs. Despite being aware of Shanes self distructive personality this story still came to a shock to me. It's a sad and harrowing tale of a man who wrote some of the greatest songs and his fall from grace. James writes as if it's a work of fiction. Done in the style if a novel it makes for easy reading. It covers the creation [...]

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    30. Well written and interesting account of the influential Irish punk band, which the author played accordion in. The author offers a stark account of frontman Shane MacGowan's crippling alcoholism and increasingly petulant behavior, though I was left curious as to where his inspired lyrics came from. Fearnley has a great command of the language, but too often chooses the word no one understands for the one that would more clearly make his point. Not sure about the titleI kept waiting for it to pop [...]

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