Dresden: A Survivor's Story

  • Title: Dresden: A Survivor's Story
  • Author: Victor Gregg
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 126
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dresden A Survivor s Story In Victor Gregg published Rifleman about his time on the front line in World War II The experience of writing that memoir sparked long buried memories of his experience during the Dresden bombin
    In 2011, Victor Gregg published Rifleman about his time on the front line in World War II The experience of writing that memoir sparked long buried memories of his experience during the Dresden bombing Whilst Kurt Vonnegut s acclaimed Slaughterhouse Five draws on his experience as a Prisoner of War imprisoned in a deep cellar in Dresden while the firestorm raged throughIn 2011, Victor Gregg published Rifleman about his time on the front line in World War II The experience of writing that memoir sparked long buried memories of his experience during the Dresden bombing Whilst Kurt Vonnegut s acclaimed Slaughterhouse Five draws on his experience as a Prisoner of War imprisoned in a deep cellar in Dresden while the firestorm raged through the city, wiping out generations of innocent lives, Victor Gregg remained above ground This is his story.In four air raids between 13 and 15 February 1945, 772 Lancaster bombers of the British Royal Air Force and 527 of the United States Army Air Forces dropped than 3,900 tons of high explosive bombs and incendiary devices on Dresden The resulting firestorm destroyed 15 square kilometres, or 6 square miles, of the city centre 25,000 people, mostly civilians, were estimated to have been killed Post war discussion of whether or not the attacks were justified has led to the bombing becoming one of the moral issues of the Second World War.An established soldier turning his uniform to the 10th Parachute Regiment in 1944, he was captured at Arnhem where he volunteered to be sent to a work camp rather than become another faceless number in the huge POW camps With two failed escape attempts under his belt, Gregg was eventually caught sabotaging a factory and sent for execution Gregg s first hand narrative, personal and punchy, sees him through the trauma and carnage of the Dresden bombing After the raid he spent five days helping to recover a city of innocent civilians, thousands of whom had died in the fire storm, trapped underground in human ovens As order was restored his life was once in danger and he escaped to the east, spending the last weeks of the war with the Russians.Harrowing and vivid, Gregg draws us in to the heart wrenching, often futile attempts to save lives, and the tentative friendships and near misses along the way.

    • Dresden: A Survivor's Story : Victor Gregg
      126 Victor Gregg
    • thumbnail Title: Dresden: A Survivor's Story : Victor Gregg
      Posted by:Victor Gregg
      Published :2018-012-27T14:08:53+00:00

    About Victor Gregg


    1. Victor Gregg Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Dresden: A Survivor's Story book, this is one of the most wanted Victor Gregg author readers around the world.


    309 Comments


    1. I feel very bad giving this two stars, but I can't justify any higher. It needs tighter editing, and most of it is cobbled together. Additionally, while looking up the author, I noticed that much of this appeared in an UK newspaper, which is easily accessible. I'm not complaining; I most likely would've still brought it; I just would've liked to have known before buying it.My main problem with this essay isn't the fact that I think Mr. Gregg is a pacifist, an apolgist or anything. I trust the pu [...]

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    2. Find this and other reviews at: flashlightcommentary.Before I get too far ahead of myself, I want to make one thing perfectly clear. I like Victor Gregg's Dresden a lot, but I can't justify giving it more than three stars. First hands accounts such as this are priceless, but the book is not a complete memoir nor is it a comprehensive study of the bombing of Dresden and as a reviewer, I have to factor more than content alone.Others have noted the writing is a little rough and I agree, but I liked [...]

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    3. All I'd ever seen of the Dresden bombing was photos displayed in the Coventry blitz museum so this was both what I expected and worse. Gregg presumably recorded this or had it recorded for him, because it's not a literary masterpiece, in fact not a literary record, it's all in Greg's spoken voice or the voice his 21st century self remembers as having used in the 1940s. Which is fine because Gregg's narrative is both articulate and matter-of-fact, which makes this very short book both more eloque [...]

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    4. This book in just 36 pages packs one hell of a punch and give us a snaphot into hell. I would like to thank the author for re-living what must be horryfing memories to make sure that we don't forget what total war is about. Told through his eyes as a POW in Dresden during one of the most devastating bombings of World War II this book book horrifies and touches your heart.How many stories like this have we lost to history.

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    5. Due to be republished on the 13th of February to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the Dresden bombings. I received a review copy of Dresden from the publishers, Bloomsbury, via NetGalley.Dresden: A Survivor's Story is the brief memoir of Victor Gregg, a British soldier who, at the time the firestorm was ignited, was being held prisoner in Dresden. Managing to escape both the bombs and the prison by sheer good fortune, he then remained for the next few days helping as much as he was able with [...]

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    6. An understated personal account of a soldiers experiences as a POW waiting to be executed in Dreden. In the process he tells of the terrible bombing that befell that German city towards the end of the second world war.As an old man reflecting upon his life, you can feel his horror of what he experienced during the air raids and subsequent efforts to find survivors. He might not always find the words to convey his experiences but his memories are seared by the sights and horrors he sure and endur [...]

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    7. Worth the read for historical purposes only. The writing is poor. In addition, extremely sad topic (as to be expected). I'm sure there are better books about what happened in Dresden.

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    8. Clear, direct, and to-the-point, this book (or long article/essay) doesn't mince words or go into long-winded political thoughts. It is a journalistic story of the bombing of Dresden and the few days after it from a British POW's viewpoint. It's terrible and horrifying, but not dressed up at all. There is a brief moment at the end where Gregg's agenda is presented, but even that is very short and direct. No waxing eloquent, which makes the story all the more meaningful. Also a very quick read. I [...]

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    9. A distressing and harrowing story of the aftermath of the bombing of Dresden in WW2 from one who was there. If anyone still doubts the futility of war then this is a must read. Well worth reading.

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    10. Having just finished reading Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse-Five, I found I wanted to learn more about what happened during the bombing attacks on Dresden, Germany, during World War II. I stumbled upon this very short account written by Victor Gregg, a 93-year-old British soldier, now living in Swanmore, Hampshire, England. From 1937-1946, he was Rifleman VJ Gregg, 2nd battalion, The Rifle Brigade & 10th Parachute Regiment, Army Air Corps and prisoner of war, held in Dresden, Germany. While writi [...]

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    11. I have never read a such a tiny book filled with so much real life war drama. the author cites his chief reasons for writing this book,' The only reason for keeping this atrocity in the public eye is to horrify people so much that they never again allow their representatives to order such crimes. there is no excuse for the men who ordered this terrible event to be carried out.'I would another subtext to the above, 'and once these representatives finish their allocated tenures, they should be tri [...]

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    12. First off, I want to start with a grateful and heartfelt thank you to the author and to all of those in the armed forces, protecting us from the human forces of evil.Second, holy cow. What Mr. Gregg went through in the bombings of Dresden. It's a shame that he waited so long to set it all down on paper. It's as fleshed out as possible, but the reader can tell that much is missing. I can understand why he waited so long to write it down. It is horrifying. What the civilians went through and how t [...]

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    13. The author is now 93. In 1945 he was parachuted into Arnhem and captured. He was assigned to a prisoner working party and sabotaged the factory he was sent to, burning it to the ground. He was sentenced to be executed and was being held in Dresden when the Allied bombing raids began - which was 68 years ago today.Over three days 1300 bombers totally destroyed the city in an attack deliberately structured to create a massive inferno that killed 25,000 people. One of the first bombs blew a hole in [...]

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    14. A excellent first-hand narrative of the horrors of Dresden seen through the eyes of Victor Gregg as a POW during the days of the bombing. Written some 70 years after the events, it is light on precise detail, but perhaps it is all the stronger for that. It is Mr Gregg's overall impressions that have stayed with him over the years, and it is these condensed impressions that paint an extraordinarily vivid picture of the horrors of fire-storm bombing. The potential reader should bear in mind that t [...]

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    15. A no-frills 1st person account of one of the true horrors of the 20th century. Notable, specifically, for the author's clear intent to share only what he directly experienced, brief and to the point, there are scenes that turn Dante's wildest imaginings into children's bedtime stories. I can only applaud the author's willingness to relive - nearly 70 years later - this nightmare for the edification of those too young to even recognize the name "Dresden".

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    16. Harrowing story of fire bombing of Dresden by the Allies in early 1945. This is a remarkable personal recollection of an enlisted English POW who by chance was awaiting execution in a prisoner of war camp. Very vivid and raises the question in my mind whether the bombing was necessary or whether in other contexts would be considered a eggregious war crime.

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    17. An essay really. Memories from a P.o.w. in Dresden during the bombing. Quite badly written really, although, like other reviewers, I feel be saying this. I believe the author in his 90's when writing this.

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    18. OKThis book made you realise how horrific it was for German civilians living in a bombed city during world war 2. However, I don't think it was the most riveting read and not a page turner. I appreciate the sentiments but one of my better reads

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    19. Some writing flaws that do little to hurt the story. Anyone can tell you that the bombing of Dresden was devastating, but this witness account shows it more clearly as unimaginable horror committed against civilians.

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    20. Heart broken. So much of violence :-(. The details are very graphic and certainly not for the faint-hearted.

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    21. Short, but stunning account of American/British firebombings of German civilian populations during WW2. Should be discussed along with dropping of atomic bombs.

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    22. A quick read but it gave me an insight into the tragedy in Dresden at the time of the Allied bombings.

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    23. This story was 36 pages long. They were 36 good pages, but still, only 36 pages.

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    24. A raw account. Heroic, humbling and honest. Critical of the RAF for massive bombing of civilians from a thoughtfully patriotic British soldier.

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    25. Only wish it was longer!

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    26. Reviewed at rarebits/2013/11/ and librarything/work/1359

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    27. This book was an easy read but fascinating. The authors described vividly a horrible experience he lived through in Dresden

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    28. Harrowing account of a survivor of this terrible attack on Dresden.

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    29. Gripping quick read. Heart breaking, vivid survivor's point of view.

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