A Geek in Korea: Discovering Asian's New Kingdom of Cool

  • Title: A Geek in Korea: Discovering Asian's New Kingdom of Cool
  • Author: Daniel Tudor
  • ISBN: 9780804843843
  • Page: 295
  • Format: Paperback
  • A Geek in Korea Discovering Asian s New Kingdom of Cool For every fan of K Pop music Korean Wave dramas and Kimchi or anyone intrigued by Korea and Korean culture A Geek in Korea is a hip new guide to the land of the Samsung smartphone and Gangnam Style
    For every fan of K Pop music, Korean Wave dramas and Kimchi or anyone intrigued by Korea and Korean culture A Geek in Korea is a hip, new guide to the land of the Samsung smartphone and Gangnam Style.Author Dan Tudor first arrived in Korea on the eve of the 2002 World Cup when South Korea played Italy in the finals What he saw inspired him to return and work in Korea TudFor every fan of K Pop music, Korean Wave dramas and Kimchi or anyone intrigued by Korea and Korean culture A Geek in Korea is a hip, new guide to the land of the Samsung smartphone and Gangnam Style.Author Dan Tudor first arrived in Korea on the eve of the 2002 World Cup when South Korea played Italy in the finals What he saw inspired him to return and work in Korea Tudor served as The Economist magazine s Korea correspondent for three years and writes regular columns for the national daily Joongang Ilbo newspaper Along the way, he has developed a great love and admiration for Korean culture and the Korean people.A Geek in Korea reinvents the culture guide for the Internet age Packed with articles and photographs, it covers all the touchstones of Korean culture from Buddhism and Confucianism to chapters on the traditional arts and disciplines like Taekwondo There are chapters on cultural code words and norms personal relationships business and technology and symbols and practices that are peculiarly Korean A number of chapters are devoted to Korean pop culture, with attention to the stars, idols, and urban subcultures associated with them For visitors to Korea, the author includes a mini guide to his favorite neighborhoods in Seoul and other places of outstanding interest.Spotlighting the originality and creativity of the Koreans, debunking myths about them, and answering nagging questions like why they re so obsessed with education and success Tudor has created the perfect book for the growing ranks of Koreaphiles in this inspired, insightful, and highly informative guide.

    • A Geek in Korea: Discovering Asian's New Kingdom of Cool by Daniel Tudor
      295 Daniel Tudor
    • thumbnail Title: A Geek in Korea: Discovering Asian's New Kingdom of Cool by Daniel Tudor
      Posted by:Daniel Tudor
      Published :2019-04-25T05:17:53+00:00

    About Daniel Tudor


    1. Daniel Tudor is The Economist s Korea Correspondent He was born in Manchester, England, and is a graduate of Oxford University in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics, and also holds an MBA from Manchester University His first book, Korea The Impossible Country was released in November 2012.


    592 Comments


    1. The photos are interesting and the vibe of the book is 'fun'. It's not a serious history of South Korea or an in-depth cultural guide - it's simply a young man who shares his passion for South Korea with you. He has some neat information on technology, travel, and Seoul. He even tosses around a few Korean words here and there.If you are planning a trip to Korea, then it might be worthwhile to read just for the sake of interest.

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    2. If you are looking for a easy-to-read, interesting overview of Korea, this is the book. Each chapter covers an aspect of Korea but it is mostly focused on Seoul. I read it while in Seoul and it helped me to understand a lot of what I was seeing. It explains why there are so many coffee shops and places to drink. Where to find the crazy shopping markets. There is a good discussion of the food and there is lots of good, inexpensive food here.It is an overview and is only one person's impressions b [...]

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    3. An Englishman's Anglocentric view of an Eastern country. Gets two stars because there we some nice nuggets, genuine enthusiasm, and because I don't the huge bias was intentional. Nonetheless, throughout the book, things that were closer to the way they are done in England were described as "the real deal" (music) and superior to the Korean way. Best to learn about this interesting country elsewhere I think.

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    4. Throughy enjoyable brief yet varied guide to South Korea. Read this for sure if you’re planning a visit as this is exactly the sort of information you want (video game rooms, food, public transportation, whats up with all animated penguin characters etc). Not an in-depth look but you don’t want one of those right before you hop on a plane to Seoul. It’s a few years out of date (like former President Park Geun-hye was mentioned so passively who could have predicted?!). The author’s tone i [...]

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    5. Since I am preparing to travel to Korea in a few months, I found this book to be incredibly helpful. It provided an excellent overview of contemporary Korean life and culture, from a westerner's perspective. The blending of text and photos made reading this book an enjoyable and energizing experience. I suspect I'll review it right before I leave for Korea in the spring.

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    6. A great overview of a country I knew very little about.

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    7. I really enjoyed A Geek in Korea! I'm a Korean American and this was a perfect introduction to the traditional and pop culture of an amazing country. From the fascinating factoids to the cool photographs scattered across all the pages, it was easy to read and the author's voice and personality shined through with hilarious personal anecdotes. Overall, I would recommend this book to anyone interested in Korea or thinking about visiting it sometime.

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    8. It was a fun read, but without mentioning Park Chan Wook in cinema section is really questionable. On the other hand, I actually don't like the way how it is describing k-dramas and k-pop at all. The book seems like underestimating all the talent, based on just some examples

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    9. Impressively detailed and knowledgeable book, almost a reference or encyclopedia . Enjoyed very much and learned a lot. Well researched and written . Highly recommended . Anyone who wants to go to Korea , this book will vastly expand the options.

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    10. OkayAn informative book about a variety of subjects, however repetitive at times. Overall enjoyable for the average consumer of foreign cultures without complicated history and political explanations.

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    11. read in one sitting. it was a good and entertaining overview. i don't know what else one would need to know about cultural aspects if planning to stay for a short time and/or consume K-media. tudor even referenced Ask A Korean, where i'd mostly read about korea prior to reading this book. (i also watched various VICE documentaries and such that were on a similar level to this book, with AAK being more comprehensive on certain aspects [which is to be expected, given the respective scope and forma [...]

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    12. Speaking about K-pop, movies, food, native spirits, social relationships, tourism and what-not, Tudor makes South Korea come alive with this visually stimulating and satisfying book. Though this acts as a travel and tourist guide, the informal view on South Korea is excellent. A reader would definitely be prompted to visit the place as soon as possible.

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    13. This is a must-read for all the Koreaboos out there. The author gives us useful and interesting information about modern-day Korea as well as about its history, political evolution, customs and beliefs. The abundance of pictures makes the given information easier to picture and understand. Truly a wonderful, useful and entertaining read.

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    14. This is almost like an abridged version of the author's previous book, 'Korea The Impossible Country' though it has several personal accounts and opinions that the first does not have. Quick, easy, informative and fun with many photographs on every page. Any foreigner living in or working in Korea should read this if not 'The Impossible Country.'

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    15. I absolutely loved it!! I wish I had read this while in Korea -lots of things would have made more sense to me. But I was surprised of how well the general ambiance in Korea was captured in the book and how easy it seems to assimilate the particularities and facts.

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    16. Helped me a lot in preparing for my 3-week backpacking trip around SK. It was a good guide but it was mostly about Seoul. Which isn't bad, really, but when you venture out of the Capital, it becomes another world. Thanks, Daniel, for the tip about Reggae Chicken.

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    17. A surprisingly very comprehensive book about South Korea - past, contemporary and near future.

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    18. Read this before moving to Korea and found it very accurate and helpful :)

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    19. A fun introduction to Korea - a bit of history, a bit of geography, and quite a lot of pop culture and thoughts about day-to-day life in Korea.

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    20. This book covers a lot of topics but doesn't really go into any of them very deeply. Also, the way the book is structured can be a bit confusing to read.

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