Globe: Life in Shakespeare's London

  • Title: Globe: Life in Shakespeare's London
  • Author: Catharine Arnold
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 167
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Globe Life in Shakespeare s London The life of William Shakespeare Britain s greatest dramatist was inextricably linked with the history of London Together the great writer and the great city came of age and confronted triumph and t
    The life of William Shakespeare, Britain s greatest dramatist, was inextricably linked with the history of London Together, the great writer and the great city came of age and confronted triumph and tragedy Triumph came when Shakespeare s company, the Chamberlain s Men, opened the Globe playhouse on Bankside in 1599, under the patronage of Queen Elizabeth I Tragedy toucThe life of William Shakespeare, Britain s greatest dramatist, was inextricably linked with the history of London Together, the great writer and the great city came of age and confronted triumph and tragedy Triumph came when Shakespeare s company, the Chamberlain s Men, opened the Globe playhouse on Bankside in 1599, under the patronage of Queen Elizabeth I Tragedy touched the lives of many of his contemporaries, from fellow playwright Christopher Marlowe to the disgraced Earl of Essex, while London struggled against the ever present threat of riots, rebellions and outbreaks of plague Globe Life takes its readers on a tour of London through Shakespeare s life and work In fascinating detail, Catharine Arnold tells how acting came of age, how troupes of touring players were transformed from scruffy vagabonds into the finely dressed strutters of the Globe itself We learn about James Burbage, founder of the original Theatre, in Shoreditch, who carried timbers across the Thames to build the Globe among the bear gardens and brothels of Bankside And of the terrible night in 1613 when the theatre caught fire during a performance of King Henry VIII Rebuilt once , the Globe continued to stand as a monument to Shakespeare s genius until 1642 when it was destroyed on the orders of Oliver Cromwell And finally we learn how 300 years later, Shakespeare s Globe opened once upon the Bankside, to great acclaim, rising like a phoenix from the flames Arnold creates a vivid portrait of Shakespeare and his London from the bard s own plays and contemporary sources, combining a novelist s eye for detail with a historian s grasp of his unique contribution to the development of the English theatre This is a portrait of Shakespeare, London, the man and the myth.

    • Globe: Life in Shakespeare's London ¦ Catharine Arnold
      167 Catharine Arnold
    • thumbnail Title: Globe: Life in Shakespeare's London ¦ Catharine Arnold
      Posted by:Catharine Arnold
      Published :2019-05-19T10:04:45+00:00

    About Catharine Arnold


    1. Catharine Arnold read English at Cambridge and holds a further degree in psychology A journalist, academic and popular historian, Catharine s previous books include the novel Lost Time , winner of a Betty Trask award Her London trilogy for Simon Schuster comprises of Necropolis London and Its Dead , Bedlam London and Its Mad and City of Sin London and Its Vices.


    340 Comments


    1. I love the Globe. It’s such a fantastic place. Have I said that before somewhere? I’ll probably end up saying it again. The atmosphere is wonderful; the open-top roof spells dramatic freedom; the towering wooden beams speak of the grandeur of Shakespeare’s work, and the incense, the incense is everything. I can’t get enough of the place; I wish I could go more often. But, I suppose, going once a year will make it feel even more special. I’m digressing a bit here, but, again, it has to [...]

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    2. Excellent look at both the theatre and London in general in Shakespeare's time.An excellent and informative read.

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    3. Globe is a delightful read from start to finish. From an imagined scene that brings to life late Tudor London, Arnold takes us into a fascinating history of the London theatre scene, and Shakespeare's place in it. Arnold's prose is a delight to read and there is never a dull moment. While I already had a pretty good idea about theatre in the Elizabethan era, I still learnt a few new things from reading this book, and it will certainly appeal to both history lovers and Shakespeare fans thanks to [...]

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    4. I nearly gave up eighty pages in. As a reader you are treated to a poor, implausible flight of fancy following a teenage Shakespeare through London. Several other parts of the book do the same - attempts at fictional prose which are not well written and serve only to bulk the book out slightly to stop it being too slender. It does improve after this point, though. Where it is at its best is where genuine facts are integrated into a historical, factual narrative about the Globe. However, too much [...]

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    5. 49/45 books read in 2017Provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Actual rating: 4,5 stars'This book is a mix between fiction and non-fiction. The story is filled with factual and historical accounts, but added in are stories about what Catharine Arnold imagined life in Shakespeare's time was actually like. This might not be something everybody likes, but I loved it. I already know quite a lot about Shakespeare (I did a big project about him in my final year of high school + I study [...]

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    6. I ended up enjoying this informative history of Elizabethan theater and Shakespeare. It took me a little bit of time to get into it, but once I got going I was fully engrossed. There is a lot of interesting information included. I would recommend this to any theater, Shakespeare, and/or history enthusiast.

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    7. I was surprised how readable this book was given the subject matter. Definitely an informative read for any English teacher who uses Shakespeare in the classroom.

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    8. I initially picked up this book because I wanted to know what London was like in Shakespeare's day and this seemed like it would discuss that. While it did give some insight into what London was like and told the history of the Globe along the way, it was more of a ramble through Shakespeare's career, some of the politics and infighting of the day, and discussions of some of Shakespeare's play.Which would have been fine, except that the book lacked in objectivity and academic rigor. Neither was [...]

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    9. Super book about the history of the original Globe Theatre, opening with the state of theatre and drama when Shakespeare was young (almost non-existent), through plans for various theatres in London (mostly controversial, if not actively opposed), and closing with the great period of drama in London that ended with the demise of James I and the approaching Civil War/Commonwealth period.I liked this a lot. Great on character and period detail, it's superbly written and very readable. The sights a [...]

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    10. Arnold offers a tour of Elizabethan and Jacobean London, showing how a confluence of events (dissolution of the monasteries cutting loose a bunch of people with experience in mystery plays, London's extremely youthful population of authority-challengers, elites waking up to the power of sponsored theater companies) allowed the theaters to flourish. Her book wraps up with my overall purpose for reading it during a London research trip--how an American actor dedicated decades of his life to recons [...]

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    11. Catharine Arnold's book on the Globe Theatre is a real page-turner. True to her other books on life in London, Arnold digs down deep to give the reader a close, on-the-ground look at the people and places she writes about. Although not a biography of England's greatest bard, there's plenty of Shakespeare - but even more on the Burbages (James and Richard) that gives Arnold's story more heft. Throughout Arnold's book, however, the main actor - the Globe - remains center stage.

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    12. It started out well, but then took a sharp turn. I enjoyed all the theatre and social history as it gave a bit of context to Shakespeare's polays, Sadly, once the book starts talking about Shakespeare and the plays, it all falls down. There are a lot of factual mistakes about Shakespeare's plays and about stuff that it takes two seconds to Google. Lots of theories about Shakespeare's life that have been rejected are presented as truth. It was pretty torturous to get through.

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    13. Perfect if you want to get a quite easy-to-read insight into Shakespeare's (London) life, the history of theatre in London, and especially the history of the Globe theatre. Arnold uses a lot of Shakespeare excerpts as primary sources and tells many anecdotes. It is a good, insightful, and quite easy read.

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    14. The life of Shakespeare and his Globe in London, richly embroidered with references to his plays and others, and plenty of fascinating source material and telling quotations, such as this at the very start:Remember thee ?Ay, thou poor ghost, while memory holds a seatIn this distracted Globe.

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    15. I really enjoyed this accessible account of Shakespeare's connection with London, and the Globe theatre. Made all the better by living so close and having visited it several times!

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    16. This book talks about the history of the theatres of London – from the original ‘Theatre’ (from which all other such edifices acquired their generic name) to the second Globe (the first burnt down) and others that served a population thirsty for theatricals – until they closed with the banning of such performances by Parliament.“Globe” is also a history of the playwrights of the time and the famous players – the popular movements in the development of theatricals in Elizabethan and [...]

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    17. I picked up a bunch of non-fiction history book titles at the Globe gift shop on a trip to London, this being one of them. There are many theories surrounding Shakespeare – who he was, how many of the plays attributed to him were actually written by him, what his life was like, etc. Given that this book is ultimately about how the Globe Theatre came into being it came as no surprise that this book took the view that Shakespeare was a person who wrote all of the plays currently in his name. I a [...]

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    18. A wonderful read during the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare's death. Catharine Arnold immerses the reader in the emerging world of acting and the theatre in mid-16th century England, with the combined skills of a great storyteller and learned historian. The theatre's booming popularity and fortunes are contrasted with numerous challenges besetting it, from hostile authorities to outbreaks of the plague. Into this pressure cooker of creativity and drama arrives a young Will Shakespeare, a poorly [...]

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    19. Despite its subtitle, "Life in Shakespeare's London", this is really a book primarily about the theatres and theatre companies with which Shakespeare was associated. If you want to know about London life of the period, you need to look elsewhere. It is full of fascinating information, and most readers interested in Shakespeare will find much to relish. The weak point of the book is the opening chapter, which gives a fictional reconstruction of what Shakespeare's arrival in London might just poss [...]

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    20. Overall this was a really fascinating book. Full of history of not only The Globe, but also the people and places of Tudor London and pretty much an early history of English drama. Told in an accessible, easy to read style, you breeze through the pages very quickly.On occasion the author does slip into flights of fancy, imagining what certain people would be saying or doing, but for me that just added to the colour. It makes these people less distant in some ways.A good read for lovers of London [...]

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    21. One of the things I love most about Historical novels is when the author strikes a delightful balance between cold hard facts and painting, for the reader, a picture of what events may have been like. Catherine Arnold does just that. She weaves together the history of England and its theater scene, Shakespeare's personal history, and his writing.

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    22. A reasonably brisk overview of theatre in the time of Shakespeare (the Swan, the Rose & the Globe) although the beginning of the book Arnold attempts to describe Shakespeare's arrival in London for the first time as if she was an eye witness. Thankfully the rest of the book is a normal historical analysis. Finishes with a chapter on efforts of Sam Wanamaker to recreate the Globe.

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    23. It was OK. Boring, though.

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