Tanglewood Tales for Girls and Boys

  • Title: Tanglewood Tales for Girls and Boys
  • Author: Nathaniel Hawthorne
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 212
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Tanglewood Tales for Girls and Boys Tanglewood Tales for Boys and Girls is a book by American author Nathaniel Hawthorne a sequel to A Wonder Book for Girls and Boys It is a re writing of some of the most famous of the ancient Gre
    Tanglewood Tales for Boys and Girls 1853 is a book by American author Nathaniel Hawthorne, a sequel to A Wonder Book for Girls and Boys It is a re writing of some of the most famous of the ancient Greek myths in a volume for children.The book covers the myths of Theseus and the Minotaur Chapter The Minotaur Antaeus and the Pygmies Chapter The Pygmies DragTanglewood Tales for Boys and Girls 1853 is a book by American author Nathaniel Hawthorne, a sequel to A Wonder Book for Girls and Boys It is a re writing of some of the most famous of the ancient Greek myths in a volume for children.The book covers the myths of Theseus and the Minotaur Chapter The Minotaur Antaeus and the Pygmies Chapter The Pygmies Dragon s Teeth Chapter The Dragon s Teeth Circe s Palace Chapter Circe s Palace Proserpina, Ceres, Pluto, and the Pomegranate Seed Chapter The Pomegranate Seed Jason and the Golden Fleece Chapter The Golden Fleece In addition there is an opening introduction, titled The Wayside , in reference to The Wayside in Concord, Massachusetts, where Hawthorne lived from 1852 until his death and presumably where he was when he wrote the introduction Hawthorne recounts a visit from his young friend Eustace Bright, who requested a sequel to Wonder Book, thus explaining the origin of Tales Although Hawthorne informs us in the introduction that these stories were also later retold by Cousin Eustace, the frame stories of A Wonder Book have been abandoned.Hawthorne wrote the book while renting a small cottage in the Berkshires, a popular vacation area for the wealthy industrialists of the Gilded Age The owner of the cottage, a railroad baron, renamed the cottage Tanglewood in honor of the book written there Later, a nearby mansion was renamed Tanglewood and hosted concerts which continue to this day Excerpted from , the free encyclopedia.More e Books from MobileReference Best Books Best Price Best Search and Navigation TM All fiction books are only 0.99 All collections are only 5.99Designed for optimal navigation on Kindle and other electronic devicesSearch for any title enter mobi shortened MobileReference and a keyword for example mobi ShakespeareTo view all books, click on the MobileReference link next to a book titleLiterary Classics Over 10,000 complete works by Shakespeare, Jane Austen, Mark Twain, Conan Doyle, Jules Verne, Dickens, Tolstoy, and other authors All books feature hyperlinked table of contents, footnotes, and author biography Books are also available as collections, organized by an author Collections simplify book access through categorical, alphabetical, and chronological indexes They offer lower price, convenience of one time download, and reduce clutter of titles in your digital library.Religion The Illustrated King James Bible, American Standard Bible, World English Bible Modern Translation , Mormon Church s Sacred TextsPhilosophy Rousseau, Spinoza, Plato, Aristotle, Marx, EngelsTravel Guides and Phrasebooks for All Major Cities New York, Paris, London, Rome, Venice, Prague, Beijing, GreeceMedical Study Guides Anatomy and Physiology, Pharmacology, Abbreviations and Terminology, Human Nervous System, BiochemistryCollege Study Guides FREE Weight and Measures, Physics, Math, Chemistry, Organic

    • Tanglewood Tales for Girls and Boys « Nathaniel Hawthorne
      212 Nathaniel Hawthorne
    • thumbnail Title: Tanglewood Tales for Girls and Boys « Nathaniel Hawthorne
      Posted by:Nathaniel Hawthorne
      Published :2019-08-21T20:10:02+00:00

    About Nathaniel Hawthorne


    1. Nathaniel Hawthorne was a 19th century American novelist and short story writer He is seen as a key figure in the development of American literature for his tales of the nation s colonial history.Shortly after graduating from Bowdoin College, Hathorne changed his name to Hawthorne Hawthorne anonymously published his first work, a novel titled Fanshawe, in 1828 In 1837, he published Twice Told Tales and became engaged to Sophia Peabody the next year He worked at a Custom House and joined a Transcendentalist Utopian community, before marrying Peabody in 1842 The couple moved to The Old Manse in Concord, Massachusetts, later moving to Salem, the Berkshires, then to The Wayside in Concord The Scarlet Letter was published in 1850, followed by a succession of other novels A political appointment took Hawthorne and family to Europe before returning to The Wayside in 1860 Hawthorne died on May 19, 1864, leaving behind his wife and their three children.Much of Hawthorne s writing centers around New England and many feature moral allegories with a Puritan inspiration His work is considered part of the Romantic movement and includes novels, short stories, and a biography of his friend, the United States President Franklin Pierce.


    103 Comments


    1. Today, Nathaniel Hawthorne, former United States consul to Great Britain, is remembered more for his literary masterpieces like The Scarlet Letter and The House of Seven Gables, less for his contribution to children’s literature. First published in 1853, this story is a sequel to a popular book called A Wonder Book. In both books Hawthorne retells Greek myths and covers the tales of the Minotaur, Pgymies, dragon’s teeth, Circe’s palace, pomegranate seeds, and Golden Fleece in this narrativ [...]

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    2. This is a delightful edition of Hawthorne's Greek mythology for young readers. With a heavy cloth imprint, 150 gsm premium paper, and the 1920s illustrations from Virginia Frances Sterrett, this is one of those books that takes pride-of-place on the bookshelf. Essentially a reprint of the 1921 Penn Publishing volume, this is a win-win for youngster and adult alike.Mr. Hawthorne wrote these tales as a way to have the myths explained for younger ears. And I do mean "ears" as these stories are mean [...]

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    3. I listened to these Greek myths as told by Nathaniel Hawthorne over a weekend. My kids listened to some of these as well and really enjoyed the ones that they heard. I'm sure they'll request that we download these again the next time we have a long car ride as we all enjoyed listening. The stories are written as if being told to young listeners, so they translate perfectly to audio format.I always forget how many familiar story lines have origins in ancient Greece. These tales are truly timeless [...]

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    4. This rare edition was a gift from my good friends Kevin and Erin, and is a sequel to The Wonder Book which I have yet to read. It's strange to see children's stories from the author of The Scarlet Letter and other somewhat morally-troubling novels. His goal here was to introduce Greek mythology in a palatable and slightly less violent form to children. Perhaps it was also to soften his "image" with his readership, which would explain the fictitiously framed narrator.The story "Minotaur" is based [...]

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    5. I didn't rate this because I chose to walk away from it. I won't say it was bad - the writing was fine. I just tend to prefer my fairy tales and myths with all the dark edges and dirty bits, so the cleanup wasn't to my taste. Hawthorne's child-proofing of the myths goes so far that he makes Ariadne stay with her father out of filial devotion, rather than running off with Theseus. I also found the use of Roman deity names in Greek myths annoying. While these may seem superficial reasons to walk a [...]

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    6. I have always loved Mythology and I have always enjoyed Hawthorn's writing. To have Hawthorn re-writing a few stories is a joy indeed!This book went all too quickly. If it weren't for four children in the household at that time I probably would have completed this book in one day. For some light reading and much enjoyment I highly recommend this book.

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    7. I've read most of Hawthorne's other stories and this was a disappointment. It was the dumbing down of a few myths and generally a bleak and borng book of not-so-very fairy tales for kids. The language was clearly stilted, perhaps because Hawthorne was trying to reign in his verbosity for a younger audience.

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    8. This was my first exposure to the Greek myths. I realize Hawthorne takes much license, but he managed to capture my imagination, and, given the myth aficionado I am today, I don't think it harmed me. Those who know me, of course, may disagree. No matter: I imperiously ZOT them all.

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    9. Hawthorne retells well known Greek myths in wonderful prose. The reader does feel he or she is at the Wayside Inn listening to the stories.

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    10. I love Nathaniel Hawthorne's work and this set of Greek myths re-told for children was no exception. He brings out the humanity in all the characters and forces the reader to acknowledge our similar feelings, even when the feelings in question are the opposite of virtuous. I particularly liked the retelling of Pluto's abduction of Prosperina.

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    11. We loved this retelling of six of the stories from Greek mythology! I don't remember knowing many of these stories before, though one of my children was already familiar with the basics of the story of Pluto kidnapping Proserpina. Our next exposure to these myths will be via Bulfinch's Mythology.

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    12. We enjoyed these stories, but Tanglewood Tales didn't go over nearly as well with my girls as A Wonder Book did. We were disappointed right off the bat to discover that there would be no little interludes between stories with Eustace and all his cousins. Utterly beautiful writing, of course!

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    13. a refresher course in Greek mythology if there ever was one. sugar-coated children's versions which I wouldn't read to children bc they're pretty sexist. but the narration was good.

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    14. I loved this book and you will too if you love Greek Mythology. As soon as my grandma told me this book had Greek Mythology I quickly snatched it from her hands. I was able to quickly get into the book after the prologue(which confused me a little). My favorite chapter was "The Pomegranate Seeds" which is a similar to the familiar story of Hades and Persephone but, is enriched with more detail and different characters. I just love a story with a good kidnapping scene, I don't know why but I do. [...]

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    15. What I learnedI learned that, for this book, Hawthorne deserves to go to that part of hell reserved for those who ruin a story in the retelling. The people responsible for the Disney HERCULES belong there as well, along with those who created Clash of the Titans. My main problem is with the fact that he tires to make the greek myths APPROPRIATE FOR KIDS! That's the fun of them, reading them when you're a kid, and then years later, realizing"Holy crap, those Greeks had some sick myths!" He takes [...]

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    16. Classic and poetic book

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    17. "For fuck's sake, tell me why I can't be without you?!" I said nothing, just gave her a kiss on the fore-head. I knew she wouldn't stay away long, and I had waited. "Read me a fairy-tale, I need to sleep", still mad at me. I laughed, easy and content. "Ok", I said, smiling at us. "I don't know what's funny for you." Still mad, still fierce and silly all over. "Close your eyes", I commanded.Hawthorne was the closest thing I had to a fairy-tale. I tried Kipling the first time she asked, and she to [...]

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    18. All I will say is that Hawthorne is such a sneakily good re-teller of old myths and legends that it really is quite enjoyable. Kids and adults should find this collection of stories, which can read straight through as a novel because of the thread that Hawthorne weaves (the supposed story that he is the editor of some college student's stories), will find plenty in which to delight.I do recommend first reading "A Wonder Book for Girls and Boys." Not that it matters or anything, but you might fee [...]

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    19. I've put off reading Hawthorne's collections for children for the longest time but finally picked this one up on a rainy day. The didacticism that sabotages many of Hawthorne's works for adults is present here but seems appropriate in the context of tales told to children in part to teach them life lessons. The retellings of the ancient myths and legends are spry and clear-eyed, even if the "meta" frame of the New England storyteller and his interactions with his young audience is often too prec [...]

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    20. Tanglewood Tales by Nathaniel Hawthorne is a retelling of Greek myths (Part Two to his previous Wonder Book). I enjoy children’s lit and old-fashioned, poetic language, which could both be strikes against this book for the average adult reader. However, if you are looking for a pleasant way to improve your knowledge of Greek mythology, this is a good place to start. Hawthorne had a knack for turning the immoral escapades of the Greek gods and goddesses into moral tales for children. And he did [...]

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    21. The book was ok in general, however I really hated the fact that it was so heavily censored and simplified. I found Hawthorne's storytelling pretty amusing, and some parts are really funny, but in general I don't think it's good for the people who don't know the true version of greek myths to read it as it will give them a lot of wrong impressions. I hated the Golden Fleece story, as it was censored the most and ended so abruptly that even if I didn't know the real version I would be really disa [...]

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    22. Nathaniel Hawthorne rewrote some of the classic Roman myths in language that children could understand. This version has beautiful illustrations, and I would recommend reading it with your children. It includes the stories of Jason and the Golden Fleece, Theseus and the Minotaur, and other classic mythology. He also wrote A Wonder Book for Boys and Girls, which is also a book of mythology written for children.

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    23. I rather enjoyed this book as more of a light read for my free time. I understand that Hawthorn meant this book to be a children's story book, but I imagined these fantastic fairy tales. I didn't like how hawthorn dumbed-down his writings. I feel like that dumbing down the writing really made the stories feel lazy. Other then that, I did enjoy the books. I love Hawthorns writing style and descriptive language. I would suggest this book for whenever you need something light to read.

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    24. Greek myths in a somewhat altered form, brought to the reader in a kind of americanized conversational tone. If I were into Greek myths right now, I would be more interested. But seeing as I am in restless ennui melancholic just-look-at-the-pictures-and-count-it-as-readingwell, that means a coffee table book with big colorful pictures. Hawthorne's going in my never-finished pile, for possible future focus.

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    25. This sequel to Hawthorne's The Wonder Book also retells popular tales from Greek myth in fun and engaging ways. Designed for children, some of the more salacious details are left out, but there's still plenty of adventure and slaying of mythical beasts. A solidly entertaining collection of classical mythology.

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    26. Thoroughly enjoyable retelling of Greek myths and would be great as a read-aloud book for children (probably 6 and up). Hawthorne manages to weave in some moral lessons on courage, selflessness, and self-mastery without being too didactic. I enjoyed the first of the two books better, but taken as a whole, it was a great read.

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    27. Project Gutenberg Ebook

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    28. You have to accept the archaic language, and the fact that Hawthorne felt free to alter the stories to make them, in his mind, more suitable for children. Once I got past these two issues, I enjoyed the book very much. But I think its appeal is pretty limited, and that it's not a book that most children would enjoy today.

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    29. While these tales were written for children, Hawthorne nails the reader's attention by embellishing the characters and with wonderful prose. Yes, there are a lot of "liberties" taken with these stories, they are very good. Fun and timeless. Worth every minute.

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    30. I hate these arrangements of Greek Myths, they weren't good at all! I recommend you find some other arrangements of them if you want to read them. They are good stories but the writing is pretty bad. Not a fan of The Tanglewood Tales.

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