A Country Called Childhood: Children and the Exuberant World

  • Title: A Country Called Childhood: Children and the Exuberant World
  • Author: Jay Griffiths
  • ISBN: 9781619024298
  • Page: 294
  • Format: Hardcover
  • A Country Called Childhood Children and the Exuberant World While traveling the world in order to write her award winning book Wild Jay Griffiths became increasingly aware of the huge differences in how childhood is experienced in various cultures One central
    While traveling the world in order to write her award winning book Wild, Jay Griffiths became increasingly aware of the huge differences in how childhood is experienced in various cultures One central riddle, in particular captured her imagination why are so many children in Euro American cultures unhappy and why is it that children in traditional cultures seem happier IWhile traveling the world in order to write her award winning book Wild, Jay Griffiths became increasingly aware of the huge differences in how childhood is experienced in various cultures One central riddle, in particular captured her imagination why are so many children in Euro American cultures unhappy and why is it that children in traditional cultures seem happier In Kith, Griffiths seeks to discover why we deny our children the freedoms of space, time and the natural world Visiting communities as far apart as West Papua and the Arctic as well as the UK, and delving into history, philosophy, language and literature, she explores how children s affinity for nature is an essential and universal element of childhood It is a journey deep into the heart of what it means to be a child, and it is central to all our experiences, young and old.

    • A Country Called Childhood: Children and the Exuberant World >> Jay Griffiths
      294 Jay Griffiths
    • thumbnail Title: A Country Called Childhood: Children and the Exuberant World >> Jay Griffiths
      Posted by:Jay Griffiths
      Published :2019-06-03T00:53:54+00:00

    About Jay Griffiths


    1. Jay Griffiths was born in Manchester and studied English Literature at Oxford University She spent a couple of years living in a shed on the outskirts of Epping Forest and has travelled the world, but for many years she has been based in Wales.


    522 Comments


    1. Yet another of these well-meaning non-fiction books that seem ultimately designed to make you feel guilty. The subject of the book is interesting, there are some interesting facts and stories in it, and it's hard to disagree with the main thesis: that children grow up too distant from nature and their own instincts nowadays, therefore many of them are unnecessarily unhappy. BUT: the author does lay it on rather thick. Pages and pages brabbling about the wilds and inner spirits and the Romantics [...]

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    2. This is my first review I usually figure that no one cares about my opinion but this book was BAD enough that I felt morally obligated to say something. I suppose this will forever be on my "currently reading" list because I don't intend to ever finish it. For me to say I hate a book and actually stop reading almost NEVER happens, but I gave this book enough of a chance and it never redeemed itself.I am a firm believer in getting kids outside. (Just took my 3-month-old on a nice walk in 18 degre [...]

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    3. Started on December 22nd, abandoned on January 11th.I read an extract from this book in the Guardian sometime in early 2013 and was immediately intrigued. When I moved to Edinburgh in July I was pleasantly surprised to discover that their library system had a copy of this book, so I put myself on the waiting list sometime in August. Given that the author had recently spoken at the Edinburgh Book Festival, the waiting list was quite long, and it appears that the book even went missing at some poi [...]

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    4. “…the spirit of childhood, its sense of quest; the importance of woodlands for the psyche; the faerie realm of metaphor; the secret world of a child’s soul where the stories of childhood are whistled with the deft and fragile panache of poetry.”The term Kith, Jay Griffiths informs us, refers to our native country. Our true home; not stone buildings or sprawling urban cities but our landscape. For those of us who live in England, she means our countryside- the rolling hills and patchwork [...]

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    5. I couldn't do it. I tried. You know how sometimes candy is so sickeningly sweet? It's like, "Mmm, I love sweet things. I'll have the candy," and then you put it in your mouth and you just feel gross for days and need to run off and brush your teeth because it's just overly sweet and mushy. Yeah, reading this book is like that. I get it. Kids should be outside and play and explore and we shouldn't put them in little learning boxes and uniforms and expect them to be tiny adults. You can say that i [...]

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    6. Jay Griffiths soared away on a seven-year pilgrimage to forage for the knowledge that illuminated her book Wild. She spent a lot of time with wild tribes, and with conquered people who still had beautiful memories of wildness and freedom. As she bounced from place to place, both modern and indigenous, she became aware of a glaring difference between wild people and the dominant culture — their children.This presented her with a perplexing riddle. “Why are so many children in Euro-American cu [...]

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    7. I really enjoyed reading this book. I imagine it is probably quite polarizing though and it is pretty much a big polemic which I can imagine might rub some people the wrong way, or just be hard to get through if reading things you don't agree with is a chore. And it's easy to disagree with this, Jay Griffiths is at times quite extreme. I guess I felt it picked up around chapter 3 and in spite of the fact that it sort of made me feel like I would always be some sort of terrible failure as a paren [...]

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    8. Perhaps the most profound book I have read in a very long time. It is a big book, heavy, worthy all that kind of stuff but it is so readable, it clicks with you. I've marked quote upon quote and am hopeing all that 'good stuff' stays in the mind for ages. I don't know how you describe a book like this - part philosophy, part education theory, part lit crit, part social commentary, part 'hippie' liberal thought, part childhood memoir but it is fascinating. I'm glad I found it on the library shelv [...]

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    9. Adding to my shelf of personal bibles--guides to help me stay true to myself, my natural goodness, creativity, wonder. In one sense to serve as exemplar to my son. That it is written in stunningly gorgeous prose by a person who possesses an encyclopedic love of books and language only deepens the many pleasures I had in reading this. To read this book as some sort of parenting manual would be a disservice to the book, author, and most importantly, you, dear reader.

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    10. Wonderful meditation on what's wrong with childhood today. Creates awareness of what's important for children, and everyone else, essentially.

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    11. really interesting book which explored childhood and how other cultures raise children. sometimes it's comparative so like one group of people may practise this method of child rearing whereas in the West we do it this way. it's not saying which way is best. but just exploring how others raise their children and how perhaps in the West it's due to upbringing and social development that there are so many problems. for example in a lot of cultures or societies, children don't necessarily have one [...]

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    12. Kind of heavy in places and I'm not sure about her writing ALL the time, but mostly it was pretty good. More on historical and esoteric stuff as opposed to railing on-and-on against technology (which is what I tend to do).I thought it was a good read!~! and if the outdoors or outdoor pursuits have been a big part of your life and you're a believer in "experience" then you'll probably enjoy this book.I'm a teacher (and an ex-climber) and did notice the obligatory chapter on how regimented and stu [...]

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    13. Griffiths sets out to answer the question of why children in western cultures are so often unhappy, and the result is a richly textured, wide-ranging narrative that I think would be compelling to parents, educators, those concerned with the health of society and of our planet, and anyone captured by the magic of childhood. In traversing the landscape of childhood, the author dwells in discussion of the natural world, imagination, metaphor, education, fairy tales, and--my most kindred spirits--th [...]

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    14. There are many important concepts here, and some beauty and much personal honesty and passion. Mothers and grandmothers should read a few chapters. Language and references to literature are very fun. Downsides - this isn't scientific research but opinion and romanticism. I was thrown off by examples, plucked from the author's experience, presented as truth. Also, as there is much repetition, skimming is required! That said, Griffiths' concept of childhood is provocative, wild, beautiful and some [...]

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    15. Well, it's really 2.5 stars, interesting and well-written, and I do agree with the author that children need to experience nature, and to play outside, and shouldn't be beaten to a whimpering pulp by fanatical parents, or otherwise be abused and humiliated, butI don't romanticize children, or childhood, nor do I think children can do a very good job of raising themselves. I disagree with the author far more than I agree, which did make for a rousing read. On this subject, I would recommend "How [...]

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    16. Only this author could have written this book. Beautifully composed, this insightful cultural critique functions as an essential guide and countercurrent to all the United States neurotic parenting books and ideologies that are now popular exports. This generation of children are undeniably metaphyscially homeless and Griffiths situates childhood back in its country, kith, rooted in place.

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    17. Griffiths poetically makes the case for the need for children in the developed world to reconnect with nature. This is not a scientific study so, if that is what you are looking for, this is not for you. This book is unashamedly subjective.

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    18. I'm not sure what the point of this book is, because I couldn't get through even 1/4 of it. I kept on waiting for that aha moment, where I grasp what this book is about, but it was just a long run on sentence of poetry to me.

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