The Best of Father Brown

  • Title: The Best of Father Brown
  • Author: G.K. Chesterton
  • ISBN: 9780752851686
  • Page: 496
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Best of Father Brown This Halcyon Classics ebook contains twenty four Father Brown stories written by British author philosopher and Christian apologist G K Chesterton Chesterton wrote a number of influential
    This Halcyon Classics ebook contains twenty four Father Brown stories written by British author, philosopher, and Christian apologist G.K Chesterton Chesterton 1874 1936 wrote a number of influential religious works, including THE EVERLASTING MAN and ORTHODOXY, and was also an accomplished fiction writer Father Brown is a fictional Catholic priest who uses intuition aThis Halcyon Classics ebook contains twenty four Father Brown stories written by British author, philosopher, and Christian apologist G.K Chesterton Chesterton 1874 1936 wrote a number of influential religious works, including THE EVERLASTING MAN and ORTHODOXY, and was also an accomplished fiction writer Father Brown is a fictional Catholic priest who uses intuition and his insights into human evil to solve mysteries Father Brown is characteristically humble, and is usually rather quiet, but when he does talk, he almost always says something profound Although he tends to handle crimes with a steady, realistic approach, he believes in the supernatural as the greatest reason of all.This ebook is DRM free and includes an active table of contents for easy navigation.The Blue CrossThe Secret GardenThe Queer FeetThe Flying StarsThe Invisible ManThe Honour of Israel GowThe Wrong ShapeThe Sins of Prince SaradineThe Hammer of GodThe Eye of ApolloThe Sign of the Broken SwordThe Three Tools of DeathThe Absence of Mr GlassThe Paradise of ThievesThe Duel of Dr HirschThe Man in the PassageThe Mistake of the MachineThe Head of CaesarThe Purple WigThe Perishing of the PendragonsThe God of the GongsThe Salad of Colonel CrayThe Strange Crime of John BoulnoisThe Fairy Tale of Father BrownThis unexpurgated edition contains the complete text, with minor errors and omissions corrected.

    • The Best of Father Brown ¦ G.K. Chesterton
      496 G.K. Chesterton
    • thumbnail Title: The Best of Father Brown ¦ G.K. Chesterton
      Posted by:G.K. Chesterton
      Published :2019-05-02T00:43:44+00:00

    About G.K. Chesterton


    1. Gilbert Keith Chesterton 1874 1936 was born in London, educated at St Paul s, and went to art school at University College London In 1900, he was asked to contribute a few magazine articles on art criticism, and went on to become one of the most prolific writers of all time He wrote a hundred books, contributions to 200 , hundreds of poems, including the epic Ballad of the White Horse, five plays, five novels, and some two hundred short stories, including a popular series featuring the priest detective, Father Brown In spite of his literary accomplishments, he considered himself primarily a journalist He wrote over 4000 newspaper essays, including 30 years worth of weekly columns for the Illustrated London News, and 13 years of weekly columns for the Daily News He also edited his own newspaper, G.K s Weekly.Chesterton was equally at ease with literary and social criticism, history, politics, economics, philosophy, and theology.


    223 Comments


    1. At some point I had to make Father Brown's acquaintance, and we may nod at each other across a railway car, but I feel no need to make a complete study of his exploits.For sheer reading enjoyment, I would take any of Chesterton's nonfiction--Orthodoxy, The Everlasting Man, Thomas Aquinas, Francis of Assissi, The Well and the Shallows, etc.--any day.

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    2. If i didnt't have to read it for school I might have made it halfway partly enjoying before I gave up. I don't know, It just wasn't my thing.

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    3. Chesterton remarked that the "detective story differs from every story in this: that the reader is only happy if he feels a fool".Chesterton's detective is a clumsy, amiable little Roman Catholic priest with “a face as round and dull as a Norfolk dumpling”. His appearance in the stories is so unobtrusive that spotting him in the story is almost like a game of hide and seek with the readers. He seems to be lurking in the shadows somewhere. But don't get taken in by his humble exterior. He had [...]

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    4. I read this primarily because when a student found out that I was teaching a class on detective fiction a few years ago, she wanted to know if I was teaching Father Brown and I had no idea who he was. The intro to the book sets up Father Brown as a contrast to Sherlock Holmes in two ways:1) his character2) his means of detectionIn terms of his character, I think Chesterton is partially successful. Father Brown is usually almost invisible until he pops up part way through the story to assist in t [...]

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    5. I'm liking these stories as fun pre-bed mystery fluff, but i do find it annoying that each tale is dependent on some detail that you're not given or incapable of noticing, since it's completely glossed over without any further explanation. It's like three-minute mysteries, where the answer is 'it was an early-spring freeze, and she grabbed an icicle, stabbed him with that, then put it in a glass by the bed, where the weapon melted, destroying fingerprint evidence, as well as her husband!' or 'th [...]

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    6. I was introduced to this series of stories by my mother who had read them as a young girl. I found Father Brown a rather refreshing take on the amateur detective genre. I mean think about it, a priest who goes about resolving mysteries about him? The idea might seem unusual at first but Father Brown's quiet confidence reassures you of his abilities. The crimes are not too complex and Father Brown generally determines a solution with comfort. I think that is the chief characteristic of Father Bro [...]

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    7. This is a collection of murder mysteries solved by a dowdy, unassuming Roman Catholic priest, Father Brown. The tone and style of the narrative has much the same feel as the Sherlock Holmes mysteries, though these stories were written later, in the early 20th century. The mysteries themselves are very difficult to solve, and the reader can really never find out who the perpetrator is until the very end when Father Brown himself reveals the solution. For this reason I didn't care for these storie [...]

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    8. Chesterton's decision to cast a thoughtful Christian man as his detective is a stroke of genius and gives him opportunities to insert some really profound thoughts into what at first seems to be merely an enjoyable story. Father Brown's Christian perspective on the world and perceptive knowledge of human nature gives him insights to help solve each mystery. The quality of the individual stories varies widely, with the earlier ones generally better. On the whole, however, entertaining and gently [...]

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    9. This was going to be five stars until I read some of the later stories. You can really tell at that point that Chesterton was writing them for the money and wasn't particularly enjoying it. Also, Father Brown's quiet, inspiringly spiritual Christianity turns into the kind of craziness you'd hear from a high street preacher, culminating in a completely baffling spontaneous rant about how atheists shouldn't be allowed to own dogs because they're all savage heathens who worship ancient beast gods. [...]

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    10. This was a short-story collection, which I didn't realize. I'm not a big short-story fan because there isn't much character development. I'm always looking for another mystery author that I'll love as much as Agatha Christie, and I'd hear good things about the Father Brown series. Unfortunately, this was more in the style of Sherlock Holmes-- just an older, more formal style of writing and storytelling that I don't enjoy as much as Agatha Christie's style of personable detective.

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    11. We're in the process of downsizing in anticipation of a move back downtown. One of the necessities is to decrease our home library, and my TBR pile. (Home library is still being counted, but already is over 2,000 volumes, and not yet half done.) I am going to release this copy of this book into the wild so that it can travel, and will place it on my list of books to read in the future. It's a tough thing to do, but even readers have to make some sacrifices, sometime.

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    12. Interesting short stories. In several of the stories, the murder occurred while Father Brown was on scene. Not very smart of the murderer. While I did like these stories, I like the Sherlock Holmes, Hercule Poirot, and Miss Marple stories better. However, I very much like the way that Father Brown would refute the "naturalists" (atheists) positions.

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    13. This book consists of various murder mysteries which are solved by a Roman Catholic Priest named Father Brown. These mysteries vary in how bloody they are or they may be supposed murders that turn out in some humorous way to not actually be real murders.

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    14. It was required reading for home school, and I honestly didn't think I'd care for it. I was wrong - I really liked the stories and Father Brown, who is not a very rigid sort of "father", which is probably why I like him.

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    15. It’s always amusing how people assume that because Father Brown believes one thing they don’t believe he’ll believe everything they don’t believe; and confuse faith with superstition and therefore conclude that a man of faith is incapable of rational thought.

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    16. Very interesting endings- when Father Brown figures out the mysteries. But the story leading up to the ending, is slightly boring.

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    17. Love Father Brown. Love this book. G. K. Chesterton is entertaining and timeless. I think I've read or heard most of these before but it is always entertaining.

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    18. Not an easy read. Kind of hard to get into each story.

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    19. This was fun to read!

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    20. These stories are GREAT mysteries! I really enjoyed this book a lot.

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    21. Good generic detective fiction

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    22. While I didn't find Father Brown himself to be a really developed character (indeed, practically an incidental one in several of the stories), I did enjoy this anthology of Chesterton's stories.

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    23. Just not my type of book. Good timeless, classic murder mysteries.

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    24. This has a few different mysteries in it, and some were better then others (the better ones were the ones I figured out! :P) But it was really cool!

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    25. I always love a good mystery :)

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    26. If this is the best, I'd hate to read the worst. This book was SO boring!!

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