Hershel And The Hanukkah Goblins

  • Title: Hershel And The Hanukkah Goblins
  • Author: Eric A. Kimmel
  • ISBN: 9780590440578
  • Page: 282
  • Format: Paperback
  • Hershel And The Hanukkah Goblins What are the poor villagers to do The holiday hating hill dwelling hobgoblins are bound and determined to ruin yet another Hanukkah for them Every year the beasties snuff out the menorah candles des
    What are the poor villagers to do The holiday hating, hill dwelling hobgoblins are bound and determined to ruin yet another Hanukkah for them Every year the beasties snuff out the menorah candles, destroy the dreidels, and pitch the potato latkes on the floor But these wicked wet blankets never counted on someone as clever as Hershel of Ostropol showing up Using his wiWhat are the poor villagers to do The holiday hating, hill dwelling hobgoblins are bound and determined to ruin yet another Hanukkah for them Every year the beasties snuff out the menorah candles, destroy the dreidels, and pitch the potato latkes on the floor But these wicked wet blankets never counted on someone as clever as Hershel of Ostropol showing up Using his wits and a few props pickles, eggs, and a dreidel a square shaped top with Hebrew letters on each side Hershel manages to outwit all the creepy critters and break the spell This fabulously creative adaptation of the ancient Hanukkah story in which the Syrians forbade the Jews to worship as they wanted, keeps the spirit of the original while adding a spine tingling twist Warmth and humor prevail, even in the midst of hopeless looking circumstances Award winning illustrator Trina Schart Hyman creates lively and witty pictures that pair perfectly with Eric Kimmel s words to create this Caldecott Honor Book Ages 4 to 8 Emilie Coulter

    • Hershel And The Hanukkah Goblins BY Eric A. Kimmel
      282 Eric A. Kimmel
    • thumbnail Title: Hershel And The Hanukkah Goblins BY Eric A. Kimmel
      Posted by:Eric A. Kimmel
      Published :2019-04-21T05:15:22+00:00

    About Eric A. Kimmel


    1. Eric A Kimmel was born in Brooklyn, NY in 1946 He attended PS 193, Andries Hudde Junior High School, and Midwood High School Brooklyn College was across the street from his high school, so he didn t want to go there He headed west, to Easton, Pennsylvania where he graduated from Lafayette College in 1967 with a bachelor s degree in English literature Eric worked as an elementary school teacher at P.S 68 in Manhattan while working on his masters degree at New York University From there he went to the US Virgin Islands where he worked as a teacher and librarian He spent a lot of time lying on St Thomas beautiful beaches Returning to reality, he finished his Ph.D degree in Education at the University of Illinois in 1973 He taught courses in language arts, children s literature, and storytelling at Indiana University at South Bend in South Bend, Indiana from 1973 to 1978, and from 1978 to 1993 at Portland State University in Portland, Oregon Eric retired from college teaching in 1993 to become a full time writer He still holds the rank of Professor Emeritus of Education at Portland State Eric has wanted to be an author since he first discovered back in kindergarten that people called authors make books His first book came out in 1974 Since then he has published over fifty titles, many of which have won numerous state awards, appeared on school and library recommended lists, and won prestigious awards such as the Caldecott Honor Medal Hershel and the Hanukkah Goblins and the Sydney Taylor Picture Book Award The Chanukkah Guest and Gershon s Monster Eric travels throughout the United States and the world visiting schools, talking about his books, and telling stories His first love is sharing stories from different countries and cultures During the last several years he and his wife Doris have visited China, Norway, Italy, Russia, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, Singapore, Canada, and Panama He is always looking out for ideas for new books Eric and Doris live in Portland, Oregon Eric has a dog named Tasha, a cat named Inky, and a tank full of tropical fish He has several hobbies He loves bluegrass music He keeps his banjo next to his desk so he can practice whenever he takes a break from writing.


    872 Comments


    1. Hershel and the Chanukah Goblins by Eric Kimmel is my family's favorite Chanukah book. It holds a special place in our home, to the point where I actually purchased it last year as opposed to borrowing it from the library. We start reading this on the first day of the Jewish month of Kislev- 3 1/2 weeks before Chanukah starts- and read it over and over again until we know the story by heart. Kimmel tells a tale of Jewish village of Ostropol in Eastern Europe similar to Isaac Bashevis Singer's ta [...]

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    2. Today I had my students raise their hands if they had ever heard of Hanukkah. Not a single one of them raised their hand. So I needed to change that. For the month of December and the end of November we will be learning about Hanukkah, Kwanzaa and Christmas. This Jewish Folktale was perfect for teaching my students the basics of Hanukkah. We talked about the 8 days and what a menorah is.This book also has a 22minute short film, so my students watched that after we finished the book.

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    3. It's Christmas Eve, so I guess I'd better review a Hanukkah book! *grows horns and cloven hooves, laughs evilly*In all seriousness though, I really love this book. I read it all the time as a child, and I remember thinking what a clever little badass Herschel was. Besides, nobody else I knew was Jewish (I lived, and still do, in a primarily Catholic, white, affluent town, and so being a biracial Jewish girl I was downright exotic). The basic premise in the story is that the village synagogue is [...]

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    4. An entertaining, engaging (as well as informative) folktale-like offering of how Hershel of Ostropol, arrriving at an anonymous Eastern European village on the Eve of Hanukkah, with clever wile, with courage and perseverance rids the village synagogue of an army of nasty demonic goblins that had been preventing Hanukkah celebrations, both Eric Kimmel's narrative and Tricia Schart Hyman's accompanying illustrations are absolutely fabulous (to quote the Brit Com series, and with no pun intended). [...]

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    5. I LOVE this book! It is one of my all time favorites. It has adventure, humor and Jewish feel to it. While I understood the necessity, I got tired of the typical Chanukah book that basically explained the holiday. This one assumes some knowledge of the holiday. However, there is a summary in the back if you get questions during story time. Besides, it has illustrations by my favorite illustrator, the late great Trina Schart Hyman! And the illustrations make the book. A lot of the humor is shown [...]

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    6. “Isn’t tonight the first night of Hanukkah?” Hershel asked the villagers. “We don’t have Hanukkah, Hershel,” one of them answered sadly. “No Hanukkah? How can that be?” “It’s because of the goblins. They haunt the old synagogue at the top of the hill. They hate Hanukkah. Whenever we try to light a menorah, the goblins blow out the candles. They break our dreidels. They throw our potato latkes on the floor. Those wicked goblins make our lives miserable all year long, but on H [...]

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    7. Oh we just adored this! How wonderful that led me to it. Goblins trying to cancel Chanukah? What could be better for a seven year old adorable curly haired monster? We loved it. Herschel is so smart, and I'm sure its not a spoiler if I tell you that he saves the day. Perfect, and perfect for holiday season.

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    8. I love Jewish folktales! This is a classic "outwitting the bad guys" story, illustrated by my favorite, Trina Schart Hyman. Love it!

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    9. Hershel arrives in a village to find that the goblins who haunt the old synagogue have forbidden the celebrating of Hanukkah. To get rid of them, Hershel must spend eight nights in the synagogue, and on the eighth night, he must trick the King of the Goblins into lighting the Hanukkah candles himself.Can Hershel outwit the goblins, and save the beloved holiday? There's more than latkes riding on the outcome.An interesting and unpredictable story, with lovely illustrations by Trina Schart Hyman.

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    10. This seems very much a trickster tail to me. I read an Anansi story right before it and there are definite parallels. A village can't light their Hanukkah menorahs because goblins won't allow it. But if Hershel can light them each night and then get the goblin king to light them on the final night, then the village will be free to celebrate Hanukkah again. So Hershel sets off to do just that and through his clever, cunning tricks he is able to outsmart each goblin.

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    11. This is an interesting folktale about Hanukkah, one that I'd never heard before. I was afraid that it would be a bit too scary for our girls, but they enjoyed the story and didn't seem to be affected by the slightly creepy illustrations of the scarier goblins. The first few were actually kind of cute. Overall, it's a fantastic story and an interesting way to tell about the Jewish holiday.This book was selected as one of the books for the August 2016- Caldecott Honor discussion at the Picture-Boo [...]

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    12. A great read aloud. Lots of fun for Jews and Gentiles alike.

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    13. I listened to my wife read this to our kids. A great little folktale on a goblin curse and a brave traveler who holds his ground against the goblins.

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    14. A delightful read when I was a kid, a delightful read now that I'm an adult.Hershel and the Hanukkah Goblins tells the story of Hershel of Ostropol: a figure of Jewish folklore largely known for his wit. He happens upon a village besieged by goblins, creatures preventing them from celebrating the first night of Hanukkah. The villagers tell Hershel that the only way to defeat the goblins is to spend the remaining nights of Hanukkah in the old synagogue high on the hill, and to keep the Hanukkah c [...]

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    15. I picked this book because I want my classroom library to be as diverse and inclusive as possible. With so many books centered around Christmas traditions, it's important not to forget other holidays celebrated in winter. Since one of my best friends of nearly 20 years is Jewish, a Hanukkah story seemed like an obvious place to start expanding my collection. For a picture book, Hershel and the Hanukkah Goblins is a longer read than most, but the story flows well and easily. The illustrations sea [...]

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    16. I love a good tricking-of-the-fae story!! This was so sweet, I wish there was more of it, or more like it!

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    17. Great story with beautiful and intriguing illustrations. Highly recommended for Gr 3-5

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    18. Hershel and the Hanukkah Goblins, by Eric Kimmel, is one of my all time favorite children book. It is told in 3rd person point of view, and it has a lexile of 400 so it is for upper elementary aged students. The main characters of this book are Hershel, and the 8 Hanukkah goblins. The setting of this book is in a synagogue on top of a hill in a little Jewish town. The plot of this story is that Hershel is passing thought a Jewish town on Hanukkah eve and he asks the villagers why there aren't an [...]

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    19. Goblins are messing with Hanukkah! It's so bad that no one is even making latkes this season! What shall we do? If only we had a trickster hero to help us!This is a great, fun story written at about a Kindergarten level, although readers of any age would enjoy it. It includes some great Hanukkah information, too. I thought it was refreshing that the illustrator, Trina Schart Hyman is best-known for the Christian-themed classic Saint George and the Dragon. Clearly a broad-minded artist.My Scandin [...]

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    20. 1. Book summary, in your own words (3 pts)Hershel and the Hanukkah Goblins is a Caldecott Honor Book. It is about a man named Hershel who is traveling to a town to celebrate Hanukkah, but when he gets there he is told they do not celebrate Hanukkah. They are not allowed to because of the goblins. Hershel has to outsmart the goblins in order to be able to celebrate Hanukkah.2. Grade level, interest level, lexile (1 pt)This would be a great book for K-3rd graders, It is a great story, full of fun [...]

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    21. In the children's book written by Eric Kimmel, "Hershel and the Hanukkah Goblins," Hershel of Ostropol, arrives in a village on the first night of Hanukkah. However, the villagers have been banned from celebrating Hanukkah by goblins that haunt the old synagogue at the top of the hill. Hershel out smarts the goblins using only some eggs, a dreidl and a menorah. This book teaches the importance of holidays such as Hanukkah.I think the illustrations demonstrate the village and what the goblins loo [...]

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    22. This is one of my favorites from the entire challenge thus far. The goblins have outlawed Hanukkah, but Hershel is too smart to let them get away with it. Each night, he tricks a different goblin into letting him light the menorah, until finally he wins the holiday back from the evil creatures. The story is fun, not scary, and kids learn about dreidels, menorahs, and other Hanukkah traditions as part of the plot. The illustrations of the goblins are cartoonish, showing they are no real threat, a [...]

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    23. I had all but forgotten about this book until a friend of mine from college reminded me of it through . This book as many different things to me at many different times, but the most important of them would be taught me about strength, determination, pride in my heritage, and perseverance in the face of insurmountable odds. I can best summarize how I feel about this masterpiece of Jewish folklore with this quote from Dennis Hill's Meditation, "It's a curious thing about darkness; no amount of da [...]

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    24. It's difficult to choose, but Hershel and the Hanukkah Goblins might just be my favorite picture book on the holiday. I remember my siblings and I listening raptly as my mom read it year after year. Hershel's cunning methods of fooling the goblins that wish to halt all Hanukkah celebrations in a rural village never failed to inspire our wonder and laughter. As I reread it in adulthood, I can still hear my mom's distinct voice for Hershel and his brave acts.

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    25. 1990 Caldecott Honor - Favorite Illustration: When Hershel is playing driedel with the red goblin. I love the look of frustration on his face as he loses, time after time, to Hershel.This was a fun story and I LOVED the hilarious depictions of the goblins. The king was a bit on the creepy side but the rest were funny! I also enjoyed the small author's note, but I wish there had been more info, since Jewish fairy tales aren't as common as the more mainstream Grimms.

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    26. This is a neat Jewish folktale with neat illustrations. Hershal shows faith, courage, and cleverness in outwitting the goblins in this story. The goblin illustrations are fun, and make it an especially cute story to read between Halloween and Hanukkah. :)

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    27. I spent today read this instant classic to fifth grade today. Most of the kids have heard it but no one seemed to mind. I heard a lot of "Oh! I love that book!" It turns 25 this year and I can't believe I never added it to my GR list.

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    28. Beautiful story about the spirit of Hanukkah. :)

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    29. Great spooky holiday read, whether or not the audience knows what Hanukkah is.

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    30. I have always loved this one--maybe because of the scary goblins :-)

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