The Happy Marriage

  • Title: The Happy Marriage
  • Author: Tahar Ben Jelloun Andre Nafis-Sahely
  • ISBN: 9781612194653
  • Page: 483
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The Happy Marriage Ben Jelloun is arguably Morocco s greatest living author whose impressive body of work combines intellect and imagination in magical fusion The Guardian In The Happy Marriage the internationally acc
    Ben Jelloun is arguably Morocco s greatest living author, whose impressive body of work combines intellect and imagination in magical fusion The Guardian In The Happy Marriage, the internationally acclaimed Moroccan author Tahar Ben Jelloun tells the story of one couple first from the husband s point of view, then from the wife s just as legal reforms are about to ch Ben Jelloun is arguably Morocco s greatest living author, whose impressive body of work combines intellect and imagination in magical fusion The Guardian In The Happy Marriage, the internationally acclaimed Moroccan author Tahar Ben Jelloun tells the story of one couple first from the husband s point of view, then from the wife s just as legal reforms are about to change women s rights forever The husband, a painter in Casablanca, has been paralyzed by a stroke at the very height of his career and becomes convinced that his marriage is the sole reason for his decline Walled up within his illness and desperate to break free of a deeply destructive relationship, he finds escape in writing a secret book about his hellish marriage When his wife finds it, she responds point by point with her own version of the facts, offering her own striking and incisive reinterpretation of their story Who is right and who is wrong A thorny issue in a society where marriage remains a sacrosanct institution, but where there s also a growing awareness of women s rights And in their absorbing struggle, both sides of this modern marriage find out they may not be so enlightened after all.

    • The Happy Marriage by Tahar Ben Jelloun Andre Nafis-Sahely
      483 Tahar Ben Jelloun Andre Nafis-Sahely
    • thumbnail Title: The Happy Marriage by Tahar Ben Jelloun Andre Nafis-Sahely
      Posted by:Tahar Ben Jelloun Andre Nafis-Sahely
      Published :2019-05-13T03:00:35+00:00

    About Tahar Ben Jelloun Andre Nafis-Sahely


    1. Tahar Ben Jelloun Arabic is a Moroccan writer The entirety of his work is written in French, although his first language is Arabic He became known for his 1985 novel L Enfant de Sable The Sand Child Today he lives in Paris and continues to write He has been short listed for the Nobel Prize in Literature.


    605 Comments


    1. I read half of this book, and while it definitely wasn't bad, it didn't do much for me. The narrative keeps you at a distance from the characters, so I felt no sympathy for or interest in what was happening. And with that lacking, I don't feel compelled to read on. I'm glad I gave it a try, and I'd be interested in reading something else by this author eventually.

      Reply

    2. Tahar Ben Jelloun is a famous Moroccan writer, mulit awards winner, that writes in French. He lives in Paris and is often talked about as possible winner of Nobel Prize in Literature. The Happy Marriage ,is his super fresh still wrarm novel, also just translated to English. This new novel starts with a famous, celebrate painter turned invalid after severe stroke. Unable to move he starts his story of the years long marriage, his love life and artistic life. I deliberately said that this is his s [...]

      Reply

    3. نجمتان ونصف تحرّياً للدقّة.كنتُ سأقول أنها أقلّ أعمال بن جلّون قرباً إلى قلبي، لكن هذا الإدعاء عرضةٌ للمراجعة والفحص باعتبارِ تشتت قراءاتي له وتشظّيها بين مراحل قرائية متعددة. غير أني يقينةٌ من عدم هضمي لهذه الرواية على وجه الخصوص. ينقسمُ العمل إلى جزئين، يشغل الأوّل منهما [...]

      Reply

    4. I have made a goal this year to read more literature written in countries outside the English speaking world. Tahar Ben Jelloun was born and raised in Morocco, then began to live and write in Paris after attending The Sorbonne. He is bilingual in Arabic and French but writes in French because to him Arabic “is a sacred language, given by God in the shape of the Koran, it is intimidating—one feels very small in front of this language.” (theparisreview/intervi)I had read his most well known [...]

      Reply

    5. Et quel bonheur ! A la fin de cette lecture, j'ai eu envie de plonger le nez dans un bon chick-litt qui me fera croire de nouveau que le bonheur conjugal existe vraiment, qu'il est possible, que deux êtres peuvent tomber follement amoureux, vivre des moments magiques et être heureux ensemble jusqu'à la fin de leurs jours ! Mais n'allons pas trop vite et commençons par le commencement. Tout d'abord, notons que c'est mon premier Tahar Ben Jelloun et ceci est son dernier livre paru en 2012 chez [...]

      Reply

    6. I had for some time wanted to read a work by famed Moroccan/French author Tahar Ben Jelloun. On a whim, I picked up "Le Bonheur conjugal", having heard about it on several book blogging sites.This novel is about the break up of an 'unequal' marriage, between a intellectual, bourgeois Moroccan painter, and his much younger Berber wife of humble origins. The first three quarters of the novel are an account of the events from the husband's point of view. The final part of the novel is told from [...]

      Reply

    7. Full review at Smoke & Mirrors: books-n-music/201. I thought I would never get through this one. When I originally read about this one, I had not added it to my TBR list. It just didn't seem like one I would like. Then the other co-hosting bloggers for the Literary Wives book club wanted to read it and the publisher very kindly provided us with free review copies. But, unfortunately, this one just did not gel for me. It was a bit similar to Fates and Furies, but not much. (F & F didn't d [...]

      Reply

    8. I enjoyed this book I think because I have been married for a long time. It is a satire of each stage best summarized in the following quote:"Marriage is nothing but a declaration of war celebrated with music, good food, perfumes, incense, pretty clothes, promises, songs, and so forth."

      Reply

    9. When a stroke leaves a painter incapacitated, he endeavors to write the history of his marriage to his much-younger wife. She finds the manuscript, written by a friend with literary aspirations, and composes her own response to it. These two parts make up The Happy Marriage, the newest novel from Moroccan author Tahar Ben Jelloun.The Painter's account makes up roughly three-quarters of The Happy Marriage. He discusses his numerous affairs --- including one with a caregiver, post-stroke --- and a [...]

      Reply

    10. 2.5 and maybe actually a 3. This was a weird one. I couldn't put it down the first 130 pages or so - literally couldn't tear myself from the book.Then it was like falling off a cliff. The narrator's syntax is SO odd and I got to a point where I couldn't think of anything else - the plot was completely subsumed by the voice. (Anyone else remember that HIMYM episode with the shattering glass effect? Yeah, it was that.) Entire paragraphs would be character lectures that followed the same structure: [...]

      Reply

    11. I've read several of Tahar Ben Jelloun fiction and non fiction novels alike and I find this particular novel to be one of the best of his fiction novels sa far, but again I haven't real all his books. This novel is about a Moroccan painter, who after suffering an AVC and being paralyzed, analyzes his life and especially his failed marriage and the reasons to its failure. The two main characters are very well developed. The story of a famous painter being successful professionally and having mult [...]

      Reply

    12. Two probably awful people rant about how awful the other is. Everything is extreme, none of it is interesting.

      Reply

    13. I read 1/3 of this book and gave up. I understand the book is 2/3 from the husband's, Foulane, perspective and the last third his wife's, Amina Wakrine, rebuttal. The husband, an unnamed painter, is having multiple affairs. He and his wife have an unhappy marriage. They are from different social classes and under Moroccan cultural and religious values.The reason I gave up on the novel after slightly over 100 pages is because the plot from the painter's perspective was very repetitive with his mu [...]

      Reply

    14. This novel is mostly set in Morocco, and gives a good picture of the differences between rural and city living there. The first two thirds are written from the husband's point of view, and the last third is the wife's story. I liked how they both seemed to have the same sort of grievances against one another, but that they used different incidents to make their points. I fel t the translation was somewhat intrusive. The dialog, especially, was sometimes awkward in English and I kept trying to fi [...]

      Reply

    15. I nearly ditched this two thirds if the way through (very unusual for me), I was so sick of the nameless artist and his self-pitying rant. The book was somewhat redeemed by the fact that the wife then got to have her say. (Much more succinctly, as she points out.) What an awful couple, though. The blurb was quite misleading - it said this was about women's rights in marriage. It's not. It's about whether a wife should put up with her husband's infidelity.

      Reply

    16. Meticulously crafted, without a word our of place, and an unexpected, unsettling conclusion.

      Reply

    17. Un très bon roman. Style très simple et soigné. J'ai beaucoup adoré.

      Reply

    18. This book tells the story of a painter who was confined to a wheelchair after suffering from a stroke allegedly caused by his wife. As his wife reads his version of the event. She gives her own version of the story.It’s unusual to find a book at once freewheeling, controlled, and startlingly observant. The writing is clear; we were allowed to sympathize with both sides.Although this is a translated work, it is written in bare, straightforward, almost skeletal prose.I feel so bad for just disco [...]

      Reply

    19. Oddly like a Moroccan version of Gone Girl, except that the husband gets the first 3/4 of the book and the woman gets her short say at the end. The husband, a painter paralyzed by a stroke, spends his part of the book fuming against his wife and musing about all the woman he has "loved" during his life. I was more than ready to hear his wife's version and maybe to kick him a few times myself! Very well written, very saddening story of two people who should get divorced, but trapped by laws and c [...]

      Reply

    20. Interesting perspective on marriage - traditional role of women in the Arab countries being challenged by a woman who is not a quiet, passive type. His view of the union vs. hers. What you make of the two very different views is what this book is all about. Despite the differences, one thing remains common to both stories - the idea that initial feelings about a person can prove to be far from accurate. The role of culture plays an important part in their judgments of one another.

      Reply

    21. A diferencia de lo que apunta el título, un relato sobre la infelicidad conyugal, y el determinismo humano de dejar pasar el tiempo pese a la insostenibilidad de la situación. Interesante, aunque algo irregular (sobre todo la parte de la visión de la mujer, poco desarrollada en comparación con la del hombre).

      Reply

    22. The prose in this book, especially when it gets to Amina's parts are astounding. (Albeit translated into English for me) I do agree with most others, that the rest of the story is very plodding. I think the beauty of the fragments were the redeeming parts to me. It's worth skipping to the prologue and reading from the wife's perspective, because that's really when the book shines brightest.

      Reply

    23. I really liked the first half of the book; the male side. The second half, not so much, which is why it took me much longer than I thought it would to finish this book. The wife in this story is just not likeable and I really wanted to like her. Grrrr. I'm still conflicted on how I feel about this story, but I am glad that I finished the book.

      Reply

    24. I read half and then found myself caring less and disliking the characters more. I’ll spend my time elsewhere.

      Reply

    25. So much is happening in this novel. There are always two sides to every story and no one outside a marriage can ever really know what happens within the home. The difference in age and social status between these two may be irreconcilable. Layered with the traditional view of marriage and a feminist understanding of the constraints of traditional roles, the demographic differences between them become impossible to bridge. Neither narrator is reliable and there are truths and fallacies in both re [...]

      Reply

    26. I'd give this 3 stars at the best. As mentioned by other reviews which I've scanned through before picking this one up, I feel that the plot hadn't managed to roll out smoothly and successfully - especially from the painter's perspective. After hitting the 100 page mark, it became rather monotonous and repetitive and I found myself contemplating on whether to continue with this novel. Plus, the adoption of a third person point of view made me feel like a detached observer; I feel that inclusiven [...]

      Reply

    27. Another book to skip. A couple tells the story of their marriage: first the husband then the wife's POV. Their courtship, marriage and the deterioration of their relationship. The husband, a painter, is frustrated as he has been incapacitated by a stroke. The wife then responds with her own story. Who is right? Who is wrong? What's the real story? What's the tale here? Who cares? I can't compare this to other works ('Fates and Furies' has come up) but I will say that this does not stand alone [...]

      Reply

    28. Story of a marriage as told first by the husband and then by the wife. An ageing painter reflects upon his marriage to a much younger woman, after he is struck by paralysis and has all the time to revisit his life, including his work, wife, and numerous extra-marital dalliances. He is not repentant about cheating on his wife. On the contrary he justifies it as a result of falling out of love with his wife. The wife, in her narration, describes her humble beginnings, which explain a lot of her be [...]

      Reply

    29. I have mixed feelings about this book and I have to admit mostly because I didn't connect nor understand the characters, specially the husband, but the duplicitous wife is not high on my list also. I have to say that I was expecting something different from this book, I thought was an happy book but it is soooo not that the case, but in the end there is a lot of food for the thoughts so I was happy to read it.Ho dei sentimenti contrastanti nei confronti di questo libro, principalmente perché i [...]

      Reply

    30. l'histoire est simple et les événements très détaillés mais très bien décrits.ce que j'ai apprécié dans ce roman, c'est comment l'auteur a pu nous présenter les deux versions de la même histoire sans se sentir la redondance et la monotonie répartition des deux versions et l'enchaînement des idées dans le roman reflète implicitement à mon avis le poids et le rôle de chaque entité ( homme et femme) dans la société arabe et sa mentalité, je veux bien expliquer les détails mais [...]

      Reply

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *