We Eat Our Own

  • Title: We Eat Our Own
  • Author: Kea Wilson
  • ISBN: 9781501128318
  • Page: 278
  • Format: Hardcover
  • We Eat Our Own When a nameless struggling actor in s New York gets the call that an enigmatic director wants him for an art film set in the he flies to South America no questions asked He quickly realizes h
    When a nameless, struggling actor in 1970 s New York gets the call that an enigmatic director wants him for an art film set in the , he flies to South America, no questions asked He quickly realizes he s made a mistake when it becomes clear that he s replacing another actor who quit after seeing the script a script the director now claims doesn t exist The movie isWhen a nameless, struggling actor in 1970 s New York gets the call that an enigmatic director wants him for an art film set in the , he flies to South America, no questions asked He quickly realizes he s made a mistake when it becomes clear that he s replacing another actor who quit after seeing the script a script the director now claims doesn t exist The movie is over budget The production team seems headed for a breakdown The air is so wet that the celluloid film disintegrates.But what the actor doesn t realize is that the greatest threat might be the town itself, and the mysterious shadow economy that powers this remote jungle outpost Entrepreneurial Americans, international drug traffickers, and M 19 guerrillas are all fighting for South America s future and the groups aren t as distinct as one might think The actor thought this would be a role that would change his life Now he s worried he won t survive it.Inspired by a true story from the annals of 1970 s Italian horror film, We Eat Our Own is a journey behind the scenes of a shocking film and a thoughtful commentary on violence and its repercussions.

    • We Eat Our Own BY Kea Wilson
      278 Kea Wilson
    • thumbnail Title: We Eat Our Own BY Kea Wilson
      Posted by:Kea Wilson
      Published :2019-03-24T11:14:39+00:00

    About Kea Wilson


    1. Kea Wilson received her MFA from Washington University in St Louis, where she lives and works as a bookseller We Eat Our Own is her first novel.


    375 Comments


    1. #%^¥ stars?!?! Yikes! I truly don't know how to rate this book or what to say about it. The story is weird and the story telling is even weirder. I didn't dislike it. I didn't want to stop reading it -- in fact I felt kind of riveted -- like looking at an accident about to happen -- or is it happening -- you don't want to see it but you can't turn away. I didn't know what was going on much of the time -- but I think that was the point. I really didn't like any of the characters -- but I can't i [...]

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    2. I was thoroughly impressed with this novel.  It was hard for me to believe that it was the author's first.  I relished the way it was written, in second person and lacking quotation marks.  The language was straightforward and unadorned.  Which is ironic, because the main theme throughout this book is acting.  There are different scenarios that we follow.  First, we encounter an erratic and unconventional director shooting a horror film in the Colombian jungle.  We are introduced t [...]

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    3. Three things to note before we go into this review:#1. There are no quotation marks in this novel. I know that pisses some of you off, and I wanted to save you the trouble. That being said, it is at all times clear who is speaking. Not once did I have to backtrack to figure out who was saying what.#2. This book is fucking expensive for a debut novel in ebook form. I cringe having to pay over ten bucks for Stephen King's ebooks and this joker is $13.99. For fuck's sake, you can buy the hardcover [...]

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    4. Kea Wilson can write. Her style is unique. It took a moment to get used to, but her writing was so well crafted, that after the first chapter or two, instead of being a distraction it really held it together despite the back and forth narrative and jumping timelines.6 weeks. $217 per week. The opportunity of a lifetime. An Italian art film set the ian rainforest titled “Jungle Bloodbath”. Richard getting the lead role. Nice. What could possibly go wrong?No script, M-19 resistance compadres, [...]

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    5. 3 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum bibliosanctum/2016/10/13/So, I’ve never seen Cannibal Holocaust. Its huge cult following and legacy as a definitive film in the exploitation horror genre notwithstanding, I already know that kind of movie is not my bag, and my queasiness from viewing its page alone is confirmation enough of that. And yet, when I saw the description of this book I was immediately intrigued, especially by the part about the story being inspired by the true events surrounding th [...]

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    6. WE EAT OUR OWN, by Kea Wilson, is a novel that captured my full attention from the very first page. Written in second person POV--in my opinion, a very difficult technique to pull off successfully in this genre--I found it very unique, and the writing style very impressive overall. This story was inspired by an Italian cult film, Cannibal Holocaust, which I "had" to look up immediately after reading this.We have our--possibly psychotic--director, Ugo Vellato, who decides to film a horror movie i [...]

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    7. Here's something you won't know until you read this book: how an author can simultaneously break all the conventional rules and yet tie it all together in a package so alarmingly distinct, you wonder why other authors haven't already done this.Here's something else you won't know: how much you are going to enjoy this."We Eat Our Own" accomplishes what most authors will never do in their entire careers -- quite simply, it raises the bar. A highly original voice, the shocking (yet effective and ap [...]

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    8. So I completely misunderstood what this book was: I'd seen it labelled as horror and just dived straight in assuming it was going to be horror. It is, in fact, probably better described as literary suspense. My misunderstanding arose from the fact that it's about the making of a horror film; the author has said it's based on the story behind Cannibal Holocaust, and it does indeed bear a similarity to the events surrounding that film. Led by an eccentric Italian director, a group of inexperienced [...]

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    9. LOVED this. Definitely my favourite book of 2016 so far. It's creepy, enlightening, thoughtful and beautifully written. I can never get enough literary horror, and this is a fantastic example. Cannibal Holocaust meets [meats?] Heart of Darkness.One of my favourites of 2016, in the category 'Best Literary Horror': kirstylogan/best-books

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    10. This novel is brilliant. 70's Italian exploitation cannibal flick being filmed in Columbia with political turmoil swirling around the set and on. A book about violence (both real and imagined) and so dark, weird, human, and beautifully written. One of the best of 2016.

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    11. When a nameless actor receives a call from his agent about a "can't miss" movie opportunity in South America, he drops everything, grabs his passport, and gets on a plane with few questions asked and none answered. When he arrives on set in Columbia, his passport is taken "for safe keeping" and he quickly learns that while he may be the movie's lead actor, the title doesn't seem to mean much. He goes days without uttering a line and he's treated with increasing disdain each time he asks to see t [...]

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    12. Here is something you don't know:How freakin' good this book is.

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    13. This book is all about gross meat and humming insects and mud and bugs getting caught in your sweat and racing second person present tense and being sticky all the time and never, ever having any idea what the fuck is going on & it’s pretty incredible. A non-communicative Italian director is filming an unscripted cross between Cannibal Holocaust and The Blair Witch Project in the Colombian jungle. The project is complicated by language barriers, his reluctance to speak - ever - and rebels [...]

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    14. This book is a mess, and not in a good way.As a lifelong horror movie fan, I was initially so intrigued when I read that it was based on the production of Cannibal Holocaust, one of the most controversial exploitation films ever made.The controversy behind Cannibal Holocaust is actually pretty interesting, and We Eat Our Own mirrors it closely: An abrasive Italian film director flies a bunch of desperate no-name actors to the middle of the jungle to film a gruesome movie that they know little ab [...]

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    15. Twisted-- the best word I can use to describe this book. The plots are intertwined around each other and the prose is sharp and disturbing. Wilson's debut drags the reader into scenes that they don't really want to see, but that's kind of the point.Set in the 1970s in Columbia, this book follows a movie crew shooting a horror/exploitation film (TW) and a parallel plot about rebels and drug cartels. Deep rumination on violence. Disturbing read.

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    16. We Eat Our Own is an interesting story with elements of horror and sociological thriller intertwined with a backdrop of an art film/schlock horror low budget film (think Cannibal Holocaust). The lead character makes his way to film, leaving his overly understanding girlfriend, no script, no idea of pay and runs towards a job that he basically knows nothing about.The narrative is written in the second person and outside of the lead character calling out to himself in the third person, tends to le [...]

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    17. This beautifully written novel is about the making of an Italian art film in the jungle, which quickly brings to mind "Hannibal Holocaust", one of the most notorious horror movies in the history of the genre, a fact that the author does not hide. The jungle is the protagonist and the background, while themes such as violence, political struggle, the exploitation of the third world, the fight for survival are all explored in the pages of this wonderful horror/sociopolitical novel (a subgenre I i [...]

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    18. "We Eat Our Own" was an interesting and certainly unique book. Loosely based on the cult film Cannibal Holocaust (a very brutal and disturbing movie), the plot involves an eccentric Italian director making an art film in the Jungle. Add guerrilla groups, an unforgiving environment, a mentally unstable director, and actors/crew that have no idea what to expect next- you have the makings of a very unique story.

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    19. There's no such thing as murder in the jungle OH.GOD. This book is nothing like you expect and for the first time in awhile, I felt like I truly had no idea what was going to happen in a novel. I can see how it would be easy to make comparisons to Heart of Darkness or Lord of the Flies, but that doesn't do this story justice. While there's plenty of room for comparable discussions on human nature and what it means to be "civilized",We Eat Our Ownisn't at all what it seems and definitely makes yo [...]

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    20. If you're looking for a brilliant example of a novel in second person POV, look no further.

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    21. In 1982, Warner Herzog and crew decamped for Iquitos, deep in the drainage of Peru to make Fitzcarraldo, a film about a crazed Irishman who dreamt of bringing opera to the . In service of this goal, he takes a steamship into the jungle in search of rubber trees, at that point the ’s true hidden cash crop, all the more valued for being completely unsuitable for domestic agricultural production and therefore only obtainable through an extremely dangerous process of forage. He loses his way alon [...]

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    22. I have seen Cannibal Holocaust. I know the brutality it shows: the gang rape, brutal torture, cruelty to animals, and shock value. I know that it thrives almost solely on this: the shock value, the desire to thrust you so far out of your comfort zone that the entire movie you're flinching out of disgust and fear. I also know that it was essentially the first movie to ever do the found footage idea--the thing that The Blair Witch Project, Cloverfield, Paranormal Activity, and countless others hav [...]

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    23. The premise attracted me to this book. In a nutshell, a no name actor is hired to play the lead in an Italian exploitation horror movie that may or may not be a snuff film. I was expecting a creepy, horror story. I was also expecting a lot of violence. Therein lies the rub. Wilson plays with the reader's expectations by juxtaposing violence as entertainment with violence that actually exists in our reality - this turns into a pretty thoughtful and scathing indictment on how or why violence is re [...]

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    24. Kea Wilson's debut novel is unlike anything this reader has had the pleasure of reading. It's a literary novel that doesn't follow many of the known conventions. It's the story of the making of a horror film in the Colombian jungles, but it's told basically in a second person perspective (unusual enough in its own right, but impressive for a debut author) with some third person exposition as well as court testimony.Another convention that is ignored is the use of quotation marks when the various [...]

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    25. Very good debut novel which uses CANNIBAL HOLOCAUST as the seed premise - an unknown New York actor accepts a role in an Italian director's movie being shot in South America under sketchy circumstances. Also in the mix is a drug cartel, an American expatriate, and freedom fighters. It's a pretty deft juggling of these disparate factors have one quibble, and it's a slight one. The book is set in 1979, and has a sound guy dropping his DAT deck in the water; they would've been using Nagra tape reco [...]

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    26. I'm kinda borderline on this. I can't decide if it's brilliant or pretentious. Or both. Either way, if you read the plot outline and find it interesting, try it. The mix of unique storytelling and f-ed up mind games make this for an entertaining read at the very least. One thing though, this is labeled as "horror". I think that's misleading. It's far more a character study. So if you go into it hoping for a novel version of Cannibal Holocaust, you will be disappointed.I give this 4 stars, but re [...]

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    27. Stories live inside stories. Like Matryoshki dolls, they nest inside each other. The walls are permeable, the delineations indistinct, and viscera moves from one to another to another, and so, osmotically, verisimilitude emerges with reference and resonance. We recognize the truth of stories because they remind. Even when we’ve never heard that particular story before, the lexical and symbolic soup, sometimes called culture, we swim in makes certain elements part and parcel of what we recogniz [...]

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    28. Back when I was in college I was made aware of a horror movie called CANNIBAL HOLOCAUST. It's notorious for it's extremely graphic content, and was one of the first found footage horror movies. It was so convincing that the director, Ruggero Deodato, was arrested and charged with murder (as he'd instructed his actors to lay low for a year so as to make the movie seem more realistic), and the actors had to come forward and say 'no, we're alive, it's fine'. Some friends and I kicked around the ide [...]

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    29. This is not the book I thought it would be - but it's better. The blurb for this one isn't inaccurate per se, though I would say that it can be misleading. This isn't really a novel about the plot, it's about aftermath, and it's about theme. An important moment in this novel comes early on, when "Richard," the closest thing the story has to a main character, reflects on his lack of understanding of the frame narrative, or the story-within-the-story. This is what We Eat Our Own is, almost a colle [...]

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    30. Thanks to NetGalley, I had the chance to read an advance copy of We Eat Our Own. Although it was recommended by a friend, I went into it thinking that it wouldn’t be my type of book. I usually find second-person narration distracting, and the title led me to believe that the novel would be rife with cannibalism. Instead, I was treated to a fast-paced story that brings together the unfamiliar worlds of Italian horror films and Colombian drug traffickers. Wilson does an excellent job of creating [...]

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