The Kiln

  • Title: The Kiln
  • Author: William McIlvanney
  • ISBN: 9780340657362
  • Page: 104
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Kiln Featuring the same family two generations on as DochertyTom Docherty was in the summer of With school behind him and a summer job at a brick works Tom had his whole life before him Years la
    Featuring the same family, two generations on, as DochertyTom Docherty was 17 in the summer of 1955 With school behind him and a summer job at a brick works, Tom had his whole life before him Years later, alone in a rented flat in Edinburgh and lost in memories, Tom recalls the intellectual and sexual awakening of his youth In looking back, Tom discovers that only by unFeaturing the same family, two generations on, as DochertyTom Docherty was 17 in the summer of 1955 With school behind him and a summer job at a brick works, Tom had his whole life before him Years later, alone in a rented flat in Edinburgh and lost in memories, Tom recalls the intellectual and sexual awakening of his youth In looking back, Tom discovers that only by understanding where he comes from can he make sense of his life as it is now.

    • The Kiln >> William McIlvanney
      104 William McIlvanney
    • thumbnail Title: The Kiln >> William McIlvanney
      Posted by:William McIlvanney
      Published :2018-012-11T09:19:56+00:00

    About William McIlvanney


    1. William McIlvanney was a Scottish writer of novels, short stories, and poetry He was a champion of gritty yet poetic literature his works Laidlaw, The Papers of Tony Veitch, and Walking Wounded are all known for their portrayal of Glasgow in the 1970s He is regarded as the father of Tartan Noir and has been described as Scotland s Camus.His first book, Remedy is None, was published in 1966 and won the Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize in 1967 Docherty 1975 , a moving portrait of a miner whose courage and endurance is tested during the depression, won the Whitbread Novel Award.Laidlaw 1977 , The Papers of Tony Veitch 1983 and Strange Loyalties 1991 are crime novels featuring Inspector Jack Laidlaw Laidlaw is considered to be the first book of Tartan Noir.William McIlvanney was also an acclaimed poet, the author of The Longships in Harbour Poems 1970 and Surviving the Shipwreck 1991 , which also contains pieces of journalism, including an essay about T S Eliot McIlvanney wrote a screenplay based on his short story Dreaming published in Walking Wounded in 1989 which was filmed by BBC Scotland in 1990 and won a BAFTA.Since April 2013, McIlvanney s own website has featured personal, reflective and topical writing, as well as examples of his journalism.Adapted from enpedia wiki William


    149 Comments


    1. I’ve a lot of time for William McIlvanney and I’ve read quite a bit of his stuff (even if I’ve not got round to updating to reflect that) but for some reason I’d never got round to Docherty. I’ve had a copy of The Kiln in my possession for years but kept putting off reading it until I’d read Docherty which I think was a wise thing although your could read them the other way round.Docherty just bowled me over. No one writes like McIlvanney and gets away with it. He piles metaphor upo [...]

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    2. This was a life changing book for me. Taught me what it was to be a man, from Ayrshire and I loved it.

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    3. Description: Tom Docherty was seventeen in the summer of 1955. With school behind him and a summer job at a brick works, Tom had his whole life before him. Years later, alone in a rented flat in Edinburgh and lost in memories, Tom recalls the intellectual and sexual awakening of his youth. In looking back, Tom discovers that only by understanding where he comes from can he make sense of his life as it is now.

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    4. Philosophy delivered as soliloquy in phrases which make the heart sing, make you laugh out loud at insights into absurdities, make you gasp and think again in recognition of aspects of yourself, your life, mistakes you may have made and inward and outward journeys taken. As ever, eminently, quietly satisfying.

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    5. Sublime writing as always by McIlvanney. Possibly not the easiest book to read at times, but captures the period fantastically and the turmoil of life for a 17YO growing up to be a man in 1950's West Scotland.

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    6. Vocabulary, language, A1. Read again before Ab-Initio.

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    7. I loved this. One of those moments I wished for half stars so I could bump it up a bit. My first from this author and it's one of his most recent. I'll now go back and look for the early ones.

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    8. Extraordinary. One of those books you don't want to end.

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    9. I managed to read the first 50 pages. Total waste of time.

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