Beelzebub's Tales to His Grandson

  • Title: Beelzebub's Tales to His Grandson
  • Author: G.I. Gurdjieff
  • ISBN: 9781585424573
  • Page: 148
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Beelzebub s Tales to His Grandson The teaching of G I Gurdjieff has come to be recognized as one of the most original enduring and penetrating of our century While Gurdjieff used many different means to transmit his vision
    The teaching of G I Gurdjieff 1866 1949 has come to be recognized as one of the most original, enduring, and penetrating of our century While Gurdjieff used many different means to transmit his vision of the human dilemma and human possibility, he gave special importance to his acknowledged masterwork, Beelzebub s Tales to His Grandson Beelzebub s Tales is an oceanThe teaching of G I Gurdjieff 1866 1949 has come to be recognized as one of the most original, enduring, and penetrating of our century While Gurdjieff used many different means to transmit his vision of the human dilemma and human possibility, he gave special importance to his acknowledged masterwork, Beelzebub s Tales to His Grandson Beelzebub s Tales is an ocean of story and of ideas that one can explore for a lifetime It is majestic in scale and content, challengingly inventive in prose style, and, for those very reasons, often approached with apprehension The first English language edition of the Russian original appeared in 1950 Since then, readers have recognized the need for a revised translation that would clarify the verbal surface while respecting the author s own thought and style This revised edition, in preparation for many years under the direction of Gurdjieff s closest pupil, Jeanne de Salzmann, meets this need Originally published in 1992, this translation offers a new experience of Gurdjieff s masterpiece for contemporary readers It is presented in a sturdy cloth edition that echoes its original publication.

    • Beelzebub's Tales to His Grandson By G.I. Gurdjieff
      148 G.I. Gurdjieff
    • thumbnail Title: Beelzebub's Tales to His Grandson By G.I. Gurdjieff
      Posted by:G.I. Gurdjieff
      Published :2019-06-21T05:59:34+00:00

    About G.I. Gurdjieff


    1. Georges Ivanovich Gurdjieff Armenian , Georgian , Greek , Russian , Georgiy Ivanovich Gyurdzhiev, or Gurdjiev was an influential Greek Armenian mystic, spiritual teacher of the early to mid 20th century, and a self professed teacher of dancing.He taught that the vast majority of humanity lives their entire lives in a state of hypnotic waking sleep, but that it was possible to transcend to a higher state of consciousness and achieve full human potential Gurdjieff developed a method for doing so, calling his discipline The Work connoting work on oneself or the Method According to his principles and instructions, Gurdjieff s method for awakening one s consciousness is different from that of the fakir, monk or yogi, so his discipline is also called originally the Fourth Way At one point he described his teaching as being esoteric Christianity At different times in his life, Gurdjieff formed and closed various schools around the world to teach the work He claimed that the teachings he brought to the West from his own experiences and early travels expressed the truth found in ancient religions and wisdom teachings relating to self awareness in people s daily lives and humanity s place in the universe The title of his third series of writings, Life Is Real Only Then, When I Am , expresses the essence of his teachings His complete series of books is entitled All and Everything.


    692 Comments


    1. I read this book when I was going through my cosmic-esoteric phase. Boy, I'm glad that's over.

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    2. Part of Gurdjieff's spiritual philosophy was the importance of cultivating a clear, focused mind, staying psychically awake, and giving your undivided attention to whatever activity you happened to be undertaking. That's why Gurdjieff wrote "Beelzebub's Tales" in the manner he did. This is not light summer reading by any means. If you don't completely and intensely immerse yourself in this book and its utterly bizarre world, you'll get lost somewhere in the first paragraph. And you'll probably g [...]

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    3. Beelzebub's Tales is a massive 1200 page epic which is equivalent to de Toqueville's Democracy in America in scope and practice. Gurdjeiff writes Beelzebub as an extraterrestrial astronaut who describes his experience with the strange and illogical inhabitants on the planet Earth. He describes every facet of human life and even details the odd beliefs held by specific cultures. Written in a style which prevents passive reading, it is a difficult volume to read through but truly rewarding and wor [...]

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    4. At the beginning of Beelzebub's Tales to His Grandson, Gurdjieff discloses his purpose in its writing: "To destroy, mercilessly, without any compromises whatsoever, in the mentation and feelings of the reader, the beliefs and views, by centuries rooted in him, about everything existing in the world."To that end, Gurdjieff wrote one of the most baffling, infuriating, virtually unfathomable tomes on this or any other planet. At the same time, this book is illuminating,revelatory, humorous, and, at [...]

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    5. This was the last work of fiction I read in that nebulous time after going nuts, dropping out of undergraduate, and finally spending a few months wandering homeless through suburban and metropolitan Atlanta, but before being plucked up off the street (thanks to a very lucky recommendation from a professor I'll forever owe) to lead the development team at what would become Reflex Security. Eight years later, I'm rocking graduate school, as advanced professionally as anyone my age, and need likely [...]

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    6. This is a review of printings that remain faithful to the 1950 Edition.Gurdjieff reveals candidly in the opening pages of Beelzebub's Tales that this First Series of his writings is for the real consciousness buried within us and is intended to "destroy without mercy" the conceptions and views that have become so firmly rooted because of centuries of people living abnormally. He shows us with compelling exactness our place in the universe, our responsibility as human beings and why, despite the [...]

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    7. Not as dense as might be imagined, still a super confusing, super boring (purposefully so?) roster of everything that’s wrong with everything, peppered with old-timey technobabble nonsense and general garbled junk about souls and kundabuffers and being-essences. Most of this is infuriating (want to smack Gurdjieff everytime Beelz mentions ‘your favorites’) and disappointing (was kind of hoping for the mystic epic version of "Sympathy for the Devil"), but I respect his chuztpah, especially [...]

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    8. G.I. Gurdjieff and an objectively impartial criticism of the life of man- An analysis and a review of All and everythingThe author and The Fourth Way – An introductionThe author George Ivanovitch Gurdjieff may very well be one of the most controversial men of the 20th century. He was born in Russian Armenia of Greek ancestry in 1877 and he died in Paris in the year of 1949. When he was young, he spent the majority of his time traveling extensively throughout the East in an attempt to gain know [...]

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    9. The first 3/4 of the book were filled with fascinating insights that had me thinking about things in a different way. Before I read this book I re-read Meetings With Remarkable Men and I read Views From the Real World. I have also studied the enneagram quite extensively. As I read Beelzebub I diligently compiled a dictionary of all his special terms for things which I had to refer to constantly. Once he finished his version of the history of the world and commenced with a philosophical discussio [...]

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    10. Probably the most difficult book I've ever read, and had many false starts. However, having finished it and feeling good at the achievement, it has continued to affect my view of reality. It is an odd book, indeed. In turns fascinating and infuriating, very much a reflection of Gurdjieff himself, it made great demands on both my perception of reality and my perception of my self. It dismantled much that I held to be true. No other book has had such an effect. I will read it again, as I believe i [...]

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    11. As has been said, you must be gifted this book. It was given to me by a Gurdjieffien. It has taken several years to read. It's so many things, including a way of being. Also, Gurdjieff was a rug dealer.

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    12. An alien, guilty of an unnamed crime, is banished from the center of the universe to live on mars for millenia. After dilligently serving his sentence, he is permitted to return to his home planet. The alien tells his grandson about his life on mars, where he often observed the humans of earth - a race of delusional insane beings who are completely out of harmony with all existence.This book was written in a strange way that requires the reader to "actively mentate" while reading. Very challengi [...]

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    13. Gurdjieff's work is some of the most valuable among the entire western "occult" tradition. This is a man who sold sparrows, painted yellow, as American Canaries, after all. Beelzebub's Tales to His Grandson is structured, from the ground up, to break habitual patterns of thought, especially with regard to how we read text. It is, in a very rea"l way, one of the first truly 'postmodern' works of art. "Once upon a time a certain Russian, who in external appearance was to those around him a simple [...]

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    14. I have only read book one of this work, out of three, book one is the only having been translated into Greek. I plan to read the other two books of this work in English, later in the future.The author has consciously and diligently tried to achieve what he said is his intention: to make us question everything that we know. He is using a science fiction format (or is it not 100% science fiction?). To judge this work I need to first read all three parts, I also plan to read first part for a second [...]

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    15. I can't say I've ever read the book with the attention that is required. I went through it once, in college, and am willing to give it another go. The very interesting thing about its book is that it "speaks" to the reader who utilizes the exercise -- to read the book with all of ones attention -- on a body-sybolic level. You understand the book in a way beyond the sometimes awkward science-fiction fantasy adventure. And there is an incredible melancholy that permeates this book. The melancholy [...]

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    16. Very difficult book to read, but very very interesting point of view on the problems of modern society.

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    17. Por lo general cuando leemos un libro, por anticipado tenemos una expectativa sobre el tema, de tal forma que al irlo leyendo esta expectativa o se va satisfaciendo y nos gusta el libro, o la expectativa cae y no nos gusta el libro. Al ver opiniones de los lectores acerca del libro, algunas lo califican como un gran libro, mientras que otras lo califican como un libro incomprensible y sin sentido. Justamente Gurdjieff inicia en el prólogo una serie de advertencias para leer este libro. No se tr [...]

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    18. After finishing it in 2 weeks of extra cautious reading and decyphering metaphore after metaphore i can really say that this knowledge is a key for a 18 year old boy to be ready to start a new life in this real world which is full of cruelty. The metaphors and the real characters are so wonderfully disguised that it was shock for me when i found out who certain characters were. Awesome book would recommend but it is too long.

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    19. I rate this book a "5" for what it is - not because it's a real page turner. To call it even readable would be misleading. Cormac McCarthy has nothing on Gurdjieff when it comes to exhaustingly long sentences. CMC could blur the line betwixt sentence and paragraph. GIG starts there. One would not pick up, for example, the Garland (Flower Ornament) Sutra, turn to page 1, and begin. "Grandson" is the spewing of one of the great minds of the modern age. It is unique. It is a spectacle. It is a 10/5 [...]

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    20. If you Re unaware of your prejudices or if you are religiously decided don't torture your self to read tis book.Actually the preface tells you if the book is for you or not I am half through and this is only for open minded Imagination is more powerful than knowledge.Peace!!!

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    21. If you have the propensity to explore this then by all means read this. If you are one who would gain from this then you will finish it and gain something in the process. I did.

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    22. This was my first foray into Gurdjieff and it was a difficult book to power through. Behind the many layers of smokescreens of meaning there is a message I could feel the semblance of resonance, yet didn't feel experienced enough to gleam the whole thing. I look forward to coming back to this and more Gudjieff after having studied his philosophy and style more comprehensively

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    23. There is so much to say about this book, but I want to actually keep it short.This book is all I could expect it and more. It is a book not only for those of us who want a different way of thinking (those who feel are wired in a particular way) but also for those who are in this wiring not for a short time. It requires dedication, it is not a joke. The book itself makes several meta-teachings. The "intentional suffering and efforts" is something that reading (and understanding) the full text can [...]

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    24. I first read Meetings With Remarkable Men after being given it by a man who I didn't know and had only met once before briefly. It sat in my room for around 3 years before I read it. I new from the first page that serious concentration was needed to read the book. Otherwise it was impossible to read past the first page and understand it. This book is written the same way, but requires ever more concentration. I found that i came to a 22 letter word that was impossible (almost) to pronounce, and [...]

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    25. I believe Gurdjieff accomplished with this work exactly what he had originally set out to do. That is, of course, to destroy any set notion, concept, or solid construction of how a book of this sort should be written, read, and/or comprehended. It ranks in the top 10 most difficult reads I have ever completed, contending with The Iliad in Greek which is saying something. With its own original set of words and vocabulary, excessive and unnecessary repetitions, as well as a rather confusing dialog [...]

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    26. Admittedly this book is a slog, and purposefully so, so it's hard to rate it higher. But the effort is certainly worth it, as it's one of the most incredible, unique and thought-provoking books I've ever read.Contained within the 1200-odd pages and cryptic language is a remarkable slew of histories / alternate histories / metaphors that constantly challenge the reader's perspective and demand interpretation. Gurdjieff even creates a mini-lexicon to describe concepts both old and new to prevent t [...]

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    27. Ein charmante altmodische Science Fantasy-Buch. Beelzebub reist mit seinem Neffenich weiß nicht mehr genau wohinund erzählt ihm dabei von den merkwürdigen Zuständen auf der Erde, deren Lebewesen während eines intergalaktischen Architekturprojektes für kurze Zeit eine Art Realitätsfilter eingesetzt bekommen habe und den auch nach dessen Entfernung in sich selbst nachbildeten. Er erzählt dann die Geschichte der Menschheit, die er als Exilant auf dem Mars, gelegentlicher Besucher und Mitarb [...]

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    28. This book is extremely difficult to read due to the language choices that the author has consciously taken. He has written in this way in an attempt to slow the reader down and give them time to understand what he has written, but most of the time I found that I had zoned out and not really understood anything that I'd been reading.The book does have redeeming factors. The author has many interesting, thought provoking ideas. They're just hard to find among the confusing language.He's also horri [...]

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    29. A rabbit hole of a book that relentlessly, indefatigably digs deeper and deeper until I found myself so deeply in that I was compelled to keep going page after page after page. Mythology, cosmology, philosophy, psychology, parody, social criticism, science fiction, and more: Beelzebub’s Tales to His Grandson isn’t so much a book as it is an experience. The key to reading, processing, and absorbing Gurdjieffs’s myriad ideas is to be mindful of his ever kaleidoscoping genres so that you’re [...]

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    30. An extraordinary attempt by Gurdjieff to create beyond what the ordinary man is equipped to understand. What arrives in this book according to G is something called objective art, defined by him as art that has a specific desired effect in the reader. This story encodes much of his personal and objective views of The Fourth Way as well and was meant to be a tool for the teaching and Work of the Fourth Way. To anyone picking up Gurdjieff for the first time, it will immediately feel like a differe [...]

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