Sin Killer

  • Title: Sin Killer
  • Author: Larry McMurtry
  • ISBN: 9780743246842
  • Page: 314
  • Format: Paperback
  • Sin Killer From Pulitzer Prize winning author Larry McMurtry comes the first in a four volume epic journey through the early American frontier featuring the Berrybender family English nobility adrift in the Am
    From Pulitzer Prize winning author Larry McMurtry comes the first in a four volume epic journey through the early American frontier, featuring the Berrybender family, English nobility adrift in the American West in the 1830s.It is 1830, and the Berrybender family rich, aristocratic, English, and hopelessly out of place is on its way up the Missouri River to see the untamedFrom Pulitzer Prize winning author Larry McMurtry comes the first in a four volume epic journey through the early American frontier, featuring the Berrybender family, English nobility adrift in the American West in the 1830s.It is 1830, and the Berrybender family rich, aristocratic, English, and hopelessly out of place is on its way up the Missouri River to see the untamed West as it begins to open up With irascible determination and a great deal of outright chaos the party experiences both the awesome majesty and brutal savagery of the unexplored land, from buffalo stampedes and natural disasters to Indian raids and encounters with frontiersmen and trappers, explorers, pioneers, and one part time preacher known as the Sin Killer Packed with breathtaking adventure, charming romance, and a sense of humor stretching clear over the horizon, Sin Killer is a truly unique view of the West that could only come from the boundless skill and imagination of Larry McMurtry.

    • Sin Killer BY Larry McMurtry
      314 Larry McMurtry
    • thumbnail Title: Sin Killer BY Larry McMurtry
      Posted by:Larry McMurtry
      Published :2019-06-17T05:57:50+00:00

    About Larry McMurtry


    1. Larry McMurtry was born in Wichita Falls, Texas on June 3, 1936 He is the author of twenty nine novels, including the Pulitzer Prize winning Lonesome Dove, three memoirs, two essay collections, and than thirty screenplays His first published book, Horseman, Pass By, was adapted into the film Hud A number of his other novels also were adapted into movies as well as a television mini series.Among many other accolades, in 2006 he was the co winner of both the Best Screenplay Golden Globe and the Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay for Brokeback Mountain.


    417 Comments


    1. First of all. BAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHALet me warn you upfront If you are the overly sensitive, blushing, color within the lines, you know - that very special type of delicate flower, then by all means move the fuck away and make sure to take your smelling salts with you. This book is definitely not for you.I volunteer a day a week in a charity oriented used book store. The place is massive, the place is brilliant and most of all it has a lush, constant circulation of novels that come from peop [...]

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    2. The Berrybenders, a family of rich English aristocrats, decide to take a journey up the Missouri River in 1830's America. The goal is to see the Wild West of buffalo, Indians, frontiersmen and trappers, so with great anticipation, they lease a large boat, the steamer Rocky Mount, which is able to carry everything they need for comfort - food, servants, tutors, guides, clothes, weapons. However, the family expects America to conform to the usual social conventions of English society, particularly [...]

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    3. A ripping good yarn! Mr.McMurtry spins a tale of the American West circa 1830’s somewhere on the Missouri River. Mr. McMurtry is a skilled story-teller with wonderful dialogue and vast settings on the prairies – an unforgiveable landscape with the approach of winter. We are given a cavalcade of diverse characters, but we never lose track of who is who.The basic story is of the rich aristocratic Berrybender’s from England making their way along the Missouri River sight-seeing the American f [...]

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    4. Someone on the dust jacket said the Berrybender novels turn the western epic (Lonesome Dove) on its comedic ear. These books are farcical at times, but you can't help loving the crazy circus of characters. Every side-show freak of the Old West (real or dime novel version) is here, relishing in all their crazed glory. But McMurtry writes affectionately about these people. They may be freaks, but they're his freaks and he loves them. You will too.By the end of the fourth book, I found myself repea [...]

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    5. We have one brief moment on this planet, and we spend most of it sad and alone, wondering if anyone likes us or remembers who we are; or preparing ourselves to meet the day, to put on our professional faces and walk into our work environments and have the gumption to pretend like we know what we're talking about. We are shamelessly nostalgic for past selves, past moments of our lives where we felt so assured that life was an ever-widening tree-lined avenue, and that the avenue led to contentedne [...]

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    6. Larry McMurtry reinvented the Western novel. With his debut, “Horsemen Pass By” to his Pulitzer Prize winning “Lonesome Dove,” McMurtry broke from the conventional Western made popular by Zane Gray in the early twentieth century and Louis L’Amour in the mid-twentieth century and portrayed the West—whether historical or modern—with more grit and grim.McMurtry’s speciality is character development. And perhaps no Western character is more beloved than “Lonesome Dove’s” August [...]

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    7. Another one I couldn’t finish. I think McMurtry is off and on. Some I love (Lonesome Dove, Last Picture Show) and some I detest (Comanche Moon). What was this—a comedy, drama? Most characters were buffoons; none were interesting enough to follow. I’m not wasting any more time on this review and would rather stick pins in my eyes than read three more (3!!!) incarnations.

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    8. It is only my loyalty to Larry McMurtry that prevents me from giving this only one star. Or none at all. Seriously, really, really weird.

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    9. I was thinking about the Lonesome Dove series when I picked up Sin Killer (the first book in Larry McMurtry’s Berrybender series), and I did find a strong “historical western” foundation, with plenty of action involving the frontier, wild Indians, buffalo, violent deaths, accidents, kidnappings, etc. But I also found a high level of humor and farce. As winter approaches, the somewhat ridiculous and highly entertaining Berrybender family (of England) strives to travel up the Missouri River [...]

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    10. I stuck with this book, despite my initial skepticism after the first few pages.It was a new genre of book for me, so it felt obligated to pursue it.I am not a fan of a ton a characters to learn (hence the cast of characters listing in the beginning which i needed to refer to)Superstition and simplistic, carnal relationshipsFast read and will attempt the next in the series.

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    11. This book made me wish I was illiterate. I would prefer to watch cartoons.

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    12. Oh lor', when the literary blurbs, and this has a lot of literary blurbs, tell you what an hilarious piece of literature you are about to read, then seriously consider ripping out those pages and pages of literary blurbs and making paper aeroplanes out of them and sending them flying to Antarctica. Sin Killer is funny, make no mistake, but, as is often the case with certain types of literary comedy, it's the sort of humour that involves somewhat grotesque characters slipping on banana peels and [...]

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    13. You know about the red shirt syndrome in Star Trek right? Well every character in this book is wearing a red Star Trek uniform. Metaphorically speaking of course. It's been years and years since I read Lonesome Dove but it's all coming back to me now - Larry McMurtry's style. It doesn't take too long to get into the book and we are off an amazing fast-paced adventure. Where any one of the many characters can get snuffed out at any moment. Death is almost like rain in this book - it comes and goe [...]

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    14. My latest encounter with a disappointing read is Larry McMurtry’s Sin Killer. I like McMurtry. I am an avid fan of Lonesome Dove and rank it high on my list of personal favorites. I’ve read some of his earlier works including The Last Picture Show which swept me into its soap opera like drama. But Sin Killer, the first of a four book series called The Berrybender Chronicles, left me cold. The plot was clever enough; a spoiled and eccentric English aristocratic family decides to tour the Amer [...]

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    15. I took this with me to Ocean City and it was definitely a vacation-worthy read. Love to have books that are about travel or journeys while I’m traveling! The idiosyncratic, dysfunctional, very English Berrybender family are traveling through the American West and it’s a comedy of errors right from the start. It often gets very bawdy and violent, but I found it an entertaining trip. What struck me the most was the many disparate cultures that flowed through this time period and place in Ameri [...]

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    16. A friend had given this book to me, together with the second in the series, "The Wandering Hill", which I still have to read. While I don't usually read Westerns,I read this since it was so highly recommended. I just finished reading it and did find it entertaining. The book was not what I had expected. It is total comedy; a parody of the taming of the West by the settlers. It's filled with exaggerated characterizations and incredibly ridiculous circumstances and situations. Together with this, [...]

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    17. Part of the Berrybender Narratives, this is a series of four books. I'm out of order, as I started this series with book #3 - By Sorrows River.Sin Killer, the name given to the frontiersman Jim Snow is the first book of the series. The ending felt incomplete, as I expect McMurtry had the future books, and a series in mind.The multitude of characters are tragic, and amusing as Lord B and his party hunt off the shores of the Missouri river with much of his family and entourage enduring this very r [...]

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    18. The last book I read by McMurtry was Lonesome Dove, so by contrast, I found Sin Killer almost whimsical. I would best describe it as a comedy errors dressed in western garb. It's the first in a tetralogy and so it does leave you without a sense of conclusion. The characters are fairly one dimensional to start, which makes sense as there are so many. You do get a feel that this first book is merely the set up for much longer character arcs and more entwined plot lines. Hopefully, that will come a [...]

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    19. This was a book on tape, and it kept putting me to sleep--not a good thing when you're driving! Altogether, I found the characters disagreeable and had a hard time caring about them. I couldn't wait until we arrived at our destination and I didn't have to listen to it anymore. (My husband/travel companion found it mildly interesting.)

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    20. A truly Original take on the Earl; 18th Century American West,by a true master of the genre, where the aristocratic Lord Berrybender Family led by the incompetent patriarch of the brood, goes in search of the hunt, on the Western Frontier, whilst losing various members of his family, and body parts. Excellent!

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    21. Normally I like McMurty's work. But this one didn't work in any way. The English lord and his "posse" of family and misfits didn't ring true and double that for how they are killed. The protagonist didn't fit the role-he seemed whiny and confused. The historical characters they met are miscast. None of the story line worked for me.

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    22. Set in 1832, a noble English family is traveling the Missouri River. The Berrybenders have a lot of colorful characters, including the eldest daughter who leaves the family and falls in love with Jim Snow, the sin killer--an Indian killer raised by natives. I like McMurtry, but found the book to be very uneven--I didn't finish it.

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    23. Never dull, Sin Killer is a very different kind of Western novel, a genre usually populated with tough no-nonsense characters who meet every challenge with rugged, sometimes violent, resilience. This, however, is the tale of the Berrybenders, a family full of foolish, entitled, selfish British aristocrats, totally out of their element, cruising the Missouri River in a steamboat, the Rocky Mount, in the year of our Lord 1832. The Berrybender family and their ridiculously large entourage are headi [...]

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    24. I loved Lonesome Dove and Terms of Endearment. Loved. But, while I thought Sin Killer was at times funny, in the beginning, it had a certain shallowness to it that made me watch the characters, instead of living their lives. McMurtry, as a rule, does not care about 'show don't tell', he steadfast labels emotions instead of allowing the reader to live through them by showing them. When the cast is not this big (and generally unlikeable) his way of writing still works because of McMurtry's other q [...]

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    25. Sin Killer, for being a titular character sure isn't in this book a lot. This book fails in so many ways. The main character has as much desire to run to her "love" because of attraction as she does running away from her family because they are messed up. Nobody is really likable and most are completely unbelievable. One begins to question what story is really being told and to what end. Perhaps it is to demonstrate the largess of the English nobility and aristocracy of the era. It's not a love [...]

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    26. I enjoyed reading the four Berrybender books, but what seemed like an interesting, potentially powerful narrative in Sin Killer began to waver and turn into a serio-comic pastiche in book 2 and book 3 (The Wandering Hill and By Sorrow's River), only just returning to what might seem the right pitch of gravity in the concluding chapters of Folly and Glory. Not that that the farcical turn was bad, just a bit disappointing when the barely believable is attached to so much good scene-setting, and wh [...]

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    27. The two stars rating reflects more on this reader than on the book. After all, I should not expect every McMurtry book set on the plains and in the west to be Lonesome Dove. There is a farcical aspect to this book: Tasmin's "romance" with Jim Snow, the title character of the book, Lord Berrybender's ever decreasing number of digits, the almost slap-stick manner in which the members of the steamboat are whittled away by weather, Indians, one another, their own stupidity. But along side all this t [...]

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    28. The popularity of Lonesome Dove had me searching for the first book in that tetralogy, and I mistakenly bought this, the first book of the Berrybender series, instead.I started reading. It was about an aristocratic family boating toward the American west on the Missouri, just for something to do. In the beginning pages, as I was getting a taste for the story and characters, one of the daughters, a young woman named Tasmin, escaped the noise of her annoying family and their tag-alongs, hired hand [...]

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    29. The first novel Sin Killer focuses primarily on the oldest daughter, Tasmin, a headstrong and talkative woman, who in an act of defiance and individualism marries a roughneck American who goes by the moniker Sin Killer. This man, Daniel Snow, is a backwoodsman who has multiple Ute wives who Tasmin doesn’t really know much about. They marry, hook up repeatedly, and Tasmin gets pregnant. Also, she’s kind of on the run from her family, not so much in a sense of being in danger or even that much [...]

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    30. A large family of English gentry headed north into a Great Plains winter on a steamboat in the early 1830s . . . .what could possibly go wrong? Larry McMurtry leads his reader on a well-paced adventure that starts out with a slightly overwhelming number of characters. That's a good thing, because almost everyone finds a way to end his or her life prematurely, and in the most comical fashion. Just when one is ready to say "Enough!", this book changes its tack and holds the reader's interest with [...]

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