A Day No Pigs Would Die

  • Title: A Day No Pigs Would Die
  • Author: Robert Newton Peck
  • ISBN: 9780307245854
  • Page: 282
  • Format: Audio CD
  • A Day No Pigs Would Die Originally published in hardcover in A Day No Pigs Would Die was one of the first young adult books along with titles like The Outsiders and The Chocolate War In it author Robert Newton Peck w
    Originally published in hardcover in 1972, A Day No Pigs Would Die was one of the first young adult books, along with titles like The Outsiders and The Chocolate War In it, author Robert Newton Peck weaves a story ofa Vermont boyhood that is part fiction, part memoir The result is a moving coming of age story that still resonates with teens today.From the Paperback editiOriginally published in hardcover in 1972, A Day No Pigs Would Die was one of the first young adult books, along with titles like The Outsiders and The Chocolate War In it, author Robert Newton Peck weaves a story ofa Vermont boyhood that is part fiction, part memoir The result is a moving coming of age story that still resonates with teens today.From the Paperback edition.

    • A Day No Pigs Would Die BY Robert Newton Peck
      282 Robert Newton Peck
    • thumbnail Title: A Day No Pigs Would Die BY Robert Newton Peck
      Posted by:Robert Newton Peck
      Published :2019-03-10T05:25:28+00:00

    About Robert Newton Peck


    1. From Robert Newton Peck is an American author of books for young adults His titles include Soup and A Day No Pigs Would Die He claims to have been born on February 17, 1928, in Vermont, but has refused to specify where Similarly, he claims to have graduated from a high school in Texas, which he has also refused to identify Some sources state that he was born in Nashville, Tennessee supposedly where his mother was born, though other sources indicate she was born in Ticonderoga, New York, and that Peck, himself, may have been born there The only reasonably certain Vermont connection is that his father was born in Cornwall.Peck has written over sixty books including a great book explaining his childhood to becoming a teenager working on the farm called A Day no Pigs would DieHe was a smart student, although his schooling was cut short by World War II During and shortly after the conflict, he served as a machine gunner in the U.S Army 88th Infantry Division Upon returning to the United States, he entered Rollins College, graduating in 1953 He then entered Cornell Law School, but never finished his course of study.Newton married Dorothy Anne Houston and fathered two children, Anne and Christopher The best man at the wedding and the godfather to the children was Fred Rogers of Mr Roger s Neighborhood fame.A Day No Pigs Would Die was his first novel, published in 1972 when he was already 44 years old From then on he continued his lifelong journey through literature To date, he has been credited for writing 55 fiction books, 6 nonfiction books, 35 songs, 3 television specials and over a hundred poems.Several of his historical novels are about Fort Ticonderoga Fawn, Hang for Treason, The King s Iron.In 1993, Peck was diagnosed with oral cancer, but survived As of 2005, he was living in Longwood, Florida, where he has in the past served as the director of the Rollins College Writers Conference Peck sings in a barbershop quartet, plays ragtime piano, and is an enthusiastic speaker His hobby is visiting schools, to turn kids on to books For information, please see answers topic robert n


    919 Comments


    1. A Day No Pigs Would Die is a book about a Shaker boy, Robert Peck, growing up in Vermont in a poor family. He skips school, and while playing hookie, comes upon a neighbor's cow in the woods who is struggling to give birth. Robert helps the calf be born, but also discovers that the cow is struggling to breathe because of something in its throat, which he manages to remove (turns out to be a goiter), saving its life. Out of gratitude, the neighbor gives Robert a baby pig, that Robert comes dearly [...]

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    2. This book has stayed with me for over 20 years and read it again tonight and cried just as hard as I did when I read it for the first time as a child. It's a horribly sad, yet beautiful story. As an adult, I found the relationships more touching than I did when I read it as a child. The heartbreak was felt, though in different ways. I don't know how old I want my children to be when they read this book, but they will read it one day.

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    3. Many readers don't like A Day No Pigs Would Die because of its religious connotations and its "sexism." Personally, I loved it because it depicts real life in all its gloryd its gruesomeness. Robert is a young boy who learns the reality of life's hardships - the necessity of doing the hard things, the joys of the little things, the truth about making decisions and becoming a man. Though I'm female, I could sympathize with Robert's maturing into an adult and coming face to face with the truths th [...]

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    4. I didn't read this book as a young adult, but I recently read it as an old adult. This is one sad story. It could also go on the "I had to face the death of my beloved pet" shelf with Old Yeller andWhere the Red Fern Grows . At least the kids who loved those dogs didn't have to eat them.

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    5. I came across this book after doing some research (for my current novel) on junior high required reading lists, and thought I'd try it. I finished it last night, and found myself horrified that junior high students might actually be required to struggle through it. Billed as a sweet little farm tale, or a coming-of-age story of a Vermont Shaker boy, there were elements that absolutely appalled me. First let me say that I am a farm woman, used to the gritty details of farm life, and in fact, I us [...]

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    6. "A Farmer's heart is rabbit soft, and a farmer's eyes are blue.But a farmer's eyes are eagle fierceand look a man right through."That's what caught my attention. It has a powerful beginning and it sums up what the book is all about. I loved reading this book, because everything is told from the perspective of a child-who turns thirteen after his Father's death. Their neighbor, Mr. Tanner tells him at thirteen is when a boy becomes a man, and he yearns for his Father love and guidance, but all he [...]

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    7. This book reflects the traditional roles for men and women that existed in farming communities of that time.Any person who thinks that this book is sexist is an IDIOT!This book is very depressing and somewhat graphic in certain ways. I never thought that this was an appropriate book for young children.It is nice to know that real life is always so sunny and so wonderful. This book certainly doesn't reflect how wonderful and how perfect life in this country really is. I guess that is why there ar [...]

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    8. This was a sweet coming-of-age story about a Shaker boy in Vermont and "his acceptance of faith, death, and the hard work of wresting a life from the land." In the course of a year, the 13-year-old takes onthe role of the man in his family. There were some down-home phraseslike: "Let's all put on the feed bag." "He'll stand without hitching" (super compliment). Also lots of wisdom: "Never miss a chance to keep your mouth shut." "Why tell people what they don't want to hear?" "A man's worship cou [...]

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    9. I am amazed at many of the negative opinions regarding this book. It is very well written, the author balances humor with realism and emotional content. Although there are some disturbing scenes, they are not fictional violence, but a part of the life of the time and place. My book club read this as adults and many of them were more upset at the scenes than the students who read the book. Sometimes as adults we seem to read more into things than children do. Weasling the dogs was very hard for m [...]

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    10. Although overall I enjoyed the book, I felt it would be somewhat challenging for younger readers. Pinky’s rape scene is quite brutal, and although there is some truth to the grotesquerie of animal husbandry- I found it a bit gruesome. Also there is quite a bit of sexism, which I found unpleasant, especially in the assumption that Pinky will be better now that she has been raped. Also the Shaker values are historically inaccurate in many ways rendering the text useless to a history class.

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    11. Boy, nothing like starting out a kids book with ripping a goiter out of cow's neck. My reading teacher read this aloud in class. More like A Day No Kids Would Eat. Normally I really enjoy horrifically downbeat "young adult" books from this era, but this book and I never really hit it off. Give me good ol' Robert Cormier or M.E. Kerr anyday.

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    12. This was the only book I ever rebelled against. In ninth grade, we were given it to read, and after a few pages, I closed it and said I'd read no more. This was unprecedented behavior for me, since I was normally quite docile vis-a-vis my teachers; open rebellion was unheard of. My teacher knew me well, and asked me why I had said I wouldn't read it. After class, I took him to the library, hauled down the "S" volume of the encyclopedia, and opened it to the article about the Shakers.Unlike the " [...]

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    13. Review “Reading this book is like sipping hot cider in front of a crackling potbellied stove. Every page is suffused with wit and charm and glowing with warmth.”–Newsweek“A lovely book. . . . Honest, moving, homely in the warm and simple sense of the word. . . . It is small, accepting and loving and it succeeds perfectly.”–Boston Globe“You’ll find yourself caught up in the novel’s emotion from the very opening scene. . . . Love suffuses every page.”–*The New York Times"With [...]

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    14. I read this book when I was very young. This book, Charlotte's Web and Summer of My German Soldier were the first three books I ever read cover to cover. This was the absolute first. I never believed that I could read a book all the way to the end until I read this book. To me, when I was in 4th grade, a book was an intimidating thing. I also did not believe in my own abilities. This book changed my way of thinking towards books. I discovered that reading was fun and entertaining and that books [...]

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    15. Whoa, I'm almost 100% certain that I read this in either the eight or ninth grade, and I loved it then. I'm curious if I'll love it now. Seems like I've been searching for the title of this book for years, and as soon as it popped up in a search, I knew instantly that I'd found it. Funny how that happens, isn't it?:)

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    16. I read this novel when I was in my early teens solely because it was banned from the school library. Nothing made me want to read a book more than when it was banned, so I immediately borrowed a copy from the public library. I remember that I loved the story, but I could not recall all that much about it. I decided to read it aloud to my son and I am so glad I did. It is now one of his favorite books.I am a bit perplexed why it was ever banned, as well as why some readers denounce the book becau [...]

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    17. I wasn't sure if I should put this on my "memoirs" shelf as well, asRobert Peck uses his own name, along with those of his father, mother, etc However, it's catagorized as "historical fiction." Any thoughts on this anyone?I haven't read this book since high school and junior high school, but thought I would pick it up again because, well because it's been so long.I found the dialogue in chapter three very similar toRobert Frost 's poem The Mending Wall Yes, good fences make good neighbors.I also [...]

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    18. A great coming of age story about young Rob Peck, a 12-year old kid. I can imagine why people are criticizing this book - some disturbing scenes involving animal slaughter, 'rape' and what may be perceived as sexism.However, the story is poignant and moving, and seems to convey the realities of a boy on the verge of becoming a man. Due to sheer chance, Rob gets to own Pinky, a cute little pig who becomes his best friend ever. From then on, life changes and culminates in Rob's coming of age.Beaut [...]

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    19. This was one of my fifth grade teacher's favorite books, and I can see why. I was more interested in this book when I found out that the whole story is true--sort of an autobiographical account or memoir. I wouldn't recommend this to just anyone because it has a lot of farm terminology, but marrying into a farming family made this book hilarious to me. I can definitely see how it would be a great read for the reluctant readers in rural areas.

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    20. A boy becoming a man and the women who help and shape him.Farm life.Tough decisions especially w/living animals.Reminded me the things and chores I had to do on our Family farm in Pennsylvania and Minnesota.Life w/animals and how we butchered, cut wood, milched the cows, baled hay and other farm related work.I felt that I was there, working along side the Peck family on their Vermont farm.

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    21. This was a realistic depiction of coming of age on a Shaker farm in Vermont. Peck described all the ins and outs of farm life, and some of it was pretty hard for me to take at times. I'll admit to bawling my eyes out at the ending. This book was very well-written, but I'd have liked one more chapter. We got to see Robert become a man in the eyes of his neighbors. I'd have liked to see his new journey start.

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    22. I had to read this in middle school. It was disgusting and disturbing because all I remember is one pig screaming and bleeding as the male mated with her. Sick. I didn't grow up on a farm or ever see animals mating, so I always assumed it was a quiet ordeal. Thanks to this book, I learned that it isn't.

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    23. Read this in junior high school, and liked it, that's about all I remember, except for it has one of the most disgusting introductions to a story ever. Almost put me off reading the rest of it. But interesting story about a farm boy in a different time, in a not TOO distant past.

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    24. [This isn't really explicitly spoilery, but you could probably guess a lot of what happens in the book by what I write.]I didn't like this book very much until I got to the last few chapters, which, considering the brutal violence of them, I probably should have hated most. I am not sure I would recommend this book to an actual child--though it is told in simple language and its narrator is twelve years old for the majority of the book, it's a little rough content-wise. (Though, my favorite book [...]

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    25. This book opened with a scene that made me truly laugh out loud. I loved the colloquial language of the 12 year old narrator throughout the book. Despite his plain upbringing and meager education, he also had an inborn sense of poet in him, and it came through when he would describe the way a certain sunset made him feel. This book broke my heart. Goshdarnit, I don't usually like to have my heart broken. Who does? But this book broke it for all the right reasons. There was so much love in this b [...]

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    26. This is one of my favorite mandatory school reads I read in middle school. The story was engaging with Northeastern life and Quaker beliefs that I found fascinating since it is vastly different from my life. Funny enough this book was how I found out about the Quaker Oats Man being of the Quaker in this book. I think everyone should read this book at least once in their life since it shows how wonderful a the family dynamic was and how deep a love for pets can go. It is also very funny to read. [...]

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    27. Lincoln Hoppe might be the best narrator that I have ever listened to! He brings a great sense of humor and feeling to this story, which I already loved from reading during my middle school days. Some people don't get the sense of humor from reading this book but Mr. Hoppe solves that problem. He differentiates the voices so well that he needs to teach classes so other narrators know how to do the same thing.

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    28. I never read this book as a child or a young adult, but have always heard mixed reviews. I'm giving it 4 stars instead of 5 only because of the very sad ending. Overall, I loved the book. It's a coming of age story about Robert, the only surviving son of a Shaker farming family in Vermont. Robert, the main character, is 12 years old when the story begins and we find Robert assisting in the birth of a calf and ultimately helping the poor cow live after removing a goiter from her throat. I found R [...]

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    29. I picked up A Day No Pigs Would Die from our old bookshelf in the basement last weekend when I went home. I couldn’t remember hearing anything about it, and had no idea if it was worth reading, but the tattered cover and faded pages seemed to whisper that I try it out. I’m so glad I did. The book follows a young 12-year-old boy named Robert who is growing up on a rural farm in Vermont. A Day No Pigs Would Die is one of those books you experience, not just read. It left me changed in a quiet [...]

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    30. I chose this because I had seen it on the banned/challenged books list and I could see that it was short (do you see a theme here?) Apparently it was challenged for its depiction of pigs mating and being slaughtered. And that is gross! There are also descriptions of a hawk killing a rabbit, squirrel hunting, and a dog killing a weasel and then having to be put down. So there is a lot of icky stuff at least to this suburban girl. While it was violent, it wasn't for the sake of violence; the latte [...]

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