What's Science Ever Done For Us: What the Simpsons Can Teach Us About Physics, Robots, Life, and the Universe

  • Title: What's Science Ever Done For Us: What the Simpsons Can Teach Us About Physics, Robots, Life, and the Universe
  • Author: Paul Halpern
  • ISBN: 9780470114605
  • Page: 306
  • Format: Paperback
  • What s Science Ever Done For Us What the Simpsons Can Teach Us About Physics Robots Life and the Universe A playful and entertaining look at science on The SimpsonsThis amusing book explores science as presented on the longest running and most popular animated TV series ever made The Simpsons Over the yea
    A playful and entertaining look at science on The SimpsonsThis amusing book explores science as presented on the longest running and most popular animated TV series ever made The Simpsons Over the years, the show has examined such issues as genetic mutation, time travel, artificial intelligence, and even aliens What s Science Ever Done for Us examines these and manyA playful and entertaining look at science on The SimpsonsThis amusing book explores science as presented on the longest running and most popular animated TV series ever made The Simpsons Over the years, the show has examined such issues as genetic mutation, time travel, artificial intelligence, and even aliens What s Science Ever Done for Us examines these and many other topics through the lens of America s favorite cartoon.This spirited science guide will inform Simpsons fans and entertain science buffs with a delightful combination of fun and fact It will be the perfect companion to the upcoming Simpsons movie.The Simpsons is a magnificent roadmap of modern issues in science This completely unauthorized, informative, and fun exploration of the science and technology, connected with the world s most famous cartoon family, looks at classic episodes from the show to launch fascinating scientific discussions mixed with intriguing speculative ideas and a dose of humor Could gravitational lensing create optical illusions, such as when Homer saw someone invisible to everyone else Is the Coriolis effect strong enough to make all toilets in the Southern Hemisphere flush clockwise, as Bart was so keen to find out If Earth were in peril, would it make sense to board a rocket, as Marge, Lisa, and Maggie did, and head to Mars While Bart and Millhouse can t stop time and have fun forever, Paul Halpern explores the theoretical possibilities involving Einstein s theory of time dilation.Paul Halpern, PhD Philadelphia, PA is Professor of Physics and Mathematics at the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia and a 2002 recipient of a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship He is also the author of The Great Beyond 0 471 46595 X.

    • What's Science Ever Done For Us: What the Simpsons Can Teach Us About Physics, Robots, Life, and the Universe >> Paul Halpern
      306 Paul Halpern
    • thumbnail Title: What's Science Ever Done For Us: What the Simpsons Can Teach Us About Physics, Robots, Life, and the Universe >> Paul Halpern
      Posted by:Paul Halpern
      Published :2019-03-06T16:30:05+00:00

    About Paul Halpern


    1. Acclaimed science writer and physicist Dr Paul Halpern is the author of fourteen popular science books, exploring the subjects of space, time, higher dimensions, dark energy, dark matter, exoplanets, particle physics, and cosmology He is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Fulbright Scholarship, and an Athenaeum Literary Award A regular contributor to NOVA s The Nature of Reality physics blog, he has appeared on numerous radio and television shows including Future Quest and The Simpsons 20th Anniversary Special.Halpern s latest book, Einstein s Dice and Schrodinger s Cat, investigates how physicists Albert Einstein and Erwin Schrodinger battled together against the incompleteness and indeterminacy of quantum mechanics Their dialogue inspired Schrodinger s famous thought experiment about a cat in a box that is in a mixed state between life and death until it is observed They struggled to find a unified field theory that would unite the forces of nature and supersede quantum weirdness Sadly they would never find success and their efforts would lead to a fiasco.More information about Paul Halpern s books and other writings can be found at phalpern


    818 Comments


    1. Schule ist was für Versager: Was wir von den Simpsons über Physik, Biologie, Roboter und das Leben lernen können behandelt naturwissenschaftliche Themen, die in der Fernsehserie The Simpsons aufgegriffen wurden. Der Autor war bemüht, auch sehr anspruchsvolle und zum Teil abstrakte Bereiche wie Kosmologie und Topographie dem interessierten Laien näher zu bringen. Die Gratwanderung zwischen korrekter wissenschaftlicher Darstellung und nötiger allgemeinverständlicher Vereinfachung ist zumeis [...]

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    2. “Science? What’s science ever done for us?” —Moe Szyslak, bartender, “Lisa the Skeptic”An interesting and amusing take at learning the science behind the daily lives of television's most famous family – The Simpsons. Those who are familiar with this TV series will know that many of the episodes do have strange scientific phenomenon in them.The book explores some of the most memorable episodes of this series and inspects the members of Springfield’s Nuclear Family and their encou [...]

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    3. Anyone who knows me knows that anything Simpsons-related is a pretty good bet for me - my best friend got this book as a just-because present. Now, I have a B.A. in English - science is not exactly my bag. But this book did a great job at exploring the scientific concepts behind some of The Simpsons' iconic episodes and characters. (For example, could radiation from a nuclear plant produce a 3-eyed fish like Blinky?) The author does a great job at discussing the science in layman's terms, and ne [...]

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    4. Sorry peeps. Just couldn't get into this one. I read a couple dozen pages in and stopped. I even assigned this to a composition class of mine(yes, composition; I've used history, sociology, philosophy, and science), but no go. I found the material a little too esoteric for my needs, and I didn't find the 'science' in it that interesting or relevant to my needs or to the needs of my students. The questions are not those I desire to explore for myself or my students: Could gravitational lensing cr [...]

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    5. A good book for a general discussion about science. Covered a variety of subjects that the Simpson's talked about in their episodesry interesting to learn about the laws of thermodynamics, with relation to the Simpson's!

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    6. fun, quick little read as a tour of different disciplines

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    7. Definitely a recommended read for any nerdy fan of the yellow-skinned clan. Each chapter addresses a Simpsons episode with a scientific concept. Could there be a Simpsons Gene that affects male Simpsons but spares the intellect of the females? Could nuclear plants give rise to three-eyed fish in the local waterways? How would a mini-black hole bend light rays so that Bart could not see roofer Ray? Does the Homer^3 episode really explore an additional dimension (aka Do the Simpsons exist in a 2D [...]

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    8. The Science of Doh!If you are a fan of The Simpsons, this book is a real treat. Halpern uses plot lines from the past twenty years of the show to discuss physics, robotics, genetics, thermodynamics, gravity, quantum mechanics, the Coriolis effect. the Theory of Relativity (both general and special), nuclear physics, time travel, cosmology, string theory, interstellar space travel, paleontology, nanotechnology, teleportation and every other scientific issue that has arisen from the show, includin [...]

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    9. This book examines various scientific topics and relates them to various episodes of the Simpsons. Topics such as genetics, thermodynamics, and astronomy are explained in relatively easy language and are related to Simpsons episodes amazingly well. Did you know that Tomacco can actually be achieved? And that Dr. Frink's teleportation machine could be plausible? Some topics are a little hard to muddle through and understand (I myself was lost during the cosmology explanations), but the author doe [...]

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    10. For anyone with a passion for the Simpsons, and an equally undeniable passion for science, this book is a must read. It was in no sense the silly book it may appear to be from the outer cover. I can't imagine a better combination than learning about the mysterious wonders of the universe while recounting in my head the great episodes of the Simpsons I have seen in the past. This book truly made me think that the guys who write the Simpsons really are as smart as I thought they were.

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    11. What's Science Ever Done for Us? is an immensely readable and enjoyable book. It relates its scientific facts with plenty of real life analogies. I liked the shorter chapters and the overall structure to the book. Some of the other books I've read have monster chapters and do not do as good a job of "leading" the reader and recognizing we probably don't have the longest attention spans for science. The material is organized in a logical way.

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    12. Essentially, this book picks out various science references that were made in Simpsons episodes, and expounds on them, explaining why some of them are impossible, and giving a more in-depth background on others. It's a nice quick read, and even if you haven't seen the episodes themselves, the book is still a nice hodge-podge of science trivia.

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    13. I thought that, by following The Simpsons plots, I would be able to really understand some science concepts. But nope. I don't know why I even try. It's a nice read, and it's fun, but I'm too dumb for this.

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    14. It was not at all what I was expecting. The author's voice came across as quite dry. He did not take advantage of the humorous aspects of the Simpsons to illustrate the science he was going to write about.

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    15. belajar sains, tak pernah sekocak iniThe Science of Doh!

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    16. Sehr amüsant und interessant.

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    17. funny and realistic

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    18. Some of the science was interesting. (For the first time I really understand what the Y2K scare was about.) The insertion of the Simpsons info was kind of akward at times.

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    19. Gave up on it, the science in it was pretty general. You'd do better to just spend your time watching "The Simpsons"

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    20. A must have book for the Simpsons fans/scientists! So funny and it shows there are plenty of science applications behind The Simpsons. Oh boy I wish I am Professor Frink!

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    21. Somewhat above me in the science world, but interesting nonetheless both in its Simpsons commentary and in the scientific theory I was able to understand

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    22. Not as interesting as some of the other pop culture/science books I've read.

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