Juggling

  • Title: Juggling
  • Author: Barbara Trapido
  • ISBN: 9780140236040
  • Page: 371
  • Format: Paperback
  • Juggling Christina and Pam are sisters less than a year apart in age Pam is tall and black haired while Christina is small and fair Brought up in New York they are sent to an English boarding school where th
    Christina and Pam are sisters less than a year apart in age Pam is tall and black haired, while Christina is small and fair Brought up in New York, they are sent to an English boarding school where they meet two boys, Peter and Jago As the years pass, the four meet and part.

    • Juggling BY Barbara Trapido
      371 Barbara Trapido
    • thumbnail Title: Juggling BY Barbara Trapido
      Posted by:Barbara Trapido
      Published :2019-06-08T05:55:30+00:00

    About Barbara Trapido


    1. Barbara Trapido Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Juggling book, this is one of the most wanted Barbara Trapido author readers around the world.


    706 Comments


    1. I wasn’t sure about this one as I haven’t read any Barbara Trapido before; but it was actually rather good. It is a sequel apparently, but works as a standalone very well. This is all about Shakespearean comedy; which is to say it’s all rather tragic; in a light and comedic sort of way. Trapido serves up twins separated at birth, a defrocked priest, misplaced siblings, coincidences that are Shakespearean in concept, switched and transposed parents, blurred genders, rape, incest, religion, [...]

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    2. 'Juggling' is a book that I quite enjoyed reading, but that I'll ultimately forget. It'll sit on my book case gathering dust, and I'll eventually donate it to charity. For all the praise I've read for Trapido's writing, I didn't see it too well. I felt it was quite naive, and almost childish at times. Perhaps I'm being too critical, but I kept expecting something amazing and profound to jump out at me, something about relationships and family (the novel heavily focuses on both, the an extreme, y [...]

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    3. One of the best ways I can describe reading this book is that you get on the horse at the beginning and it takes off at a gallop. You are flung off the horse at the end, so you stand up, look around, and try to make sense of the journey you've just been on!This is what happens when you put a bunch of holds on Overdrive and forget about them. When Juggling came in, I could not remember why I had put a hold on it, but there it was, so I read it. Happily, I was not disappointed. Trapido is a talent [...]

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    4. I'm fairly sure that I have read this before! Trapido seems to fill her books with literary references and strong Shakespearean-style coincidences and this books plays this quite heavily. Twins figure strongly, particularly pairs of twins that are significantly different (in one case of different parents!) Physical similarities do not always make people alike (or indeed to like each other) and differences do not always attract. The plot is implausible and the outrageous coincidences are knowingl [...]

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    5. Fast-paced, witty, but ultimately less satisfying than its (truly wonderful) predecessor Temples of Delight. The faith and magical qualities of the former are now replaced by a somewhat cynical comic spirit-- and what was touching before becomes somewhat ordinary. Some of the plotting seems forced, too. There's a masterful whirlwind wrap-up of juggled partnerships, but because we haven't seen any of them develop, they seem unpersuasive.

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    6. In "Jonglieren" treffen zahlreiche Personen aus komplizierten Familienverhältnissen aufeinander - neudeutsch: Kinder aus Patchwork-Familien. Christina ist die leibliche Tochter von Alice. Ihre ältere Schwester Pam wurde als Neugeborenes von Alice und Joe adoptiert, nachdem das Drama um den Tod von Pams Mutter das Paar an deren Sterbebett überhaupt erst zusammengeführt hatte. Joe ist der Verleger der Verstorbenen. Die Geschichte der ungewöhnlichen Familiengründung erzählt Mutter Alice ihre [...]

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    7. I’ve never read anything by Barbara Trapido before. Well, that’s not quite true – I tried to read Frankie and Stankie and just couldn’t get to grips with it at all. But I found Juggling in a charity shop and thought Barbara Trapido’s reputation had at least earned her another try. And how I loved this book! The cast of characters demands advanced juggling skills – the edgy Christina, her adopted sister Pam, the ethereal Peter, the slightly dangerous Jago and a vast cast of other char [...]

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    8. I read Juggling for the first time soon after it came out in 1994. Loved it then and loved it even more this time, which is lucky as my book club will be talking about it tomorrow night. (It was my turn to choose the book.) We'll also be discussing the prequel, Temples of Delight, which I reviewed here recently as well.I love novels with stratified plots and characters who surprise me. Juggling delivers on these and many other counts. I'm a Shakespeare nut, so that helps with a lot of the refere [...]

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    9. I'm afraid I just don't get it.There's an undercurrent of Shakespeare running through this, and his plot contrivances are mentioned on at least one occasion, and if this whole thing is meant to be an homage of sorts to that, then I get it.I don't like it much, but I get it.We have a saintly "angel" who occasionally floats above the ground (or above the covers -- I picture it like Sigourney Weaver in "Ghostbusters") and can stop people doing violent or bad things. He appears mainly in the backgro [...]

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    10. Barbara Trapido is a recent discovery for me and this is only the second novel of hers I have read. The "Shakespearean" tag appealed to me immensely and I have enjoyed it in this context as a literary artefact. I am always after this kind of thing, and it not always easy to find!So, what have we here? Twins, fathers and daughers, fathers and sons, couplings and uncouplings, a midwinter's dream, with ghouls instead of fairies I feel that there are so many elements from Shakespeare in this story o [...]

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    11. The sequel to Temples of Delight ~ I would say it is an advantage to have read that first and fairly recently. That way, you will recognise the background of some of the main characters, Alice and Joe, last seen about to get married, baby Pam and Alice's own daughter, Christina, both now teenagers, and Roland Dent, Alice's one time suitor. The story is witty and intriguing, like the Shakespeare comedy it tries to emulate, with just as many twists, turns and lost twins. After a slow start, I real [...]

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    12. Barabara Trapido keeps turning out these wonderfully intelligent, characterful novels. Two sisters, Pam and Christina, one dark, one fair, with contrasting temperaments make their way in the world. At boarding school the girls meet two boys, Peter and Jago, one tall and handsome, the other small and serious. It is impossible to convey in a few words the subtlety with which these relationships are drawn. Like Barbara Trapido's other novels the story is told with an exquisite sense of humour.I wou [...]

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    13. I was entertained by much of this book, but the ending got extremely silly. It is not enough for Trapido to claim so blatantly that Shakespeare's comedies tend to have silly endings. A novel is not a play, Barbara. There is just too much time for a reader to lose sympathy with something so daft and to conclude that the writer is cheating. Shakespeare only asks us to suspend our disbelief for a couple of hours and we have lots of actors and audience members to assist us in this enterprise. A nove [...]

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    14. I did not love this book either. It did not have the charm and brightness as Trapido's earlier novels. But it did gain some momentum for me as it went along. Note to Lauren: I have not read Angela Carter, so I can't say if it read like an Angela Carter novel, but there were other echoes. I thought even of Iris Murdoch. And then the father reminded me of Stanley Tucci.

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    15. After finding Brother of the more famous Jack in my childhood bookshelf and really enjoying the wierd 80s perspective on the 60s I thought I would try another one. All the characters are flawed again with sympathy swinging from one to the other but a sort of spoilt heartlessness from all of them that sometimes left me not really caring about what happened to the lot of them.

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    16. An extremely witty, lively novel. The only faults were that the ending was wrapped up too slowly, and that it was perhaps too influenced by the academic world (like a number of other authors). You do feel like pointing out that most people in the world are not like this. However these are picky criticisms of a very good novel.

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    17. Typical light, pacy, frothy Barbara Trapido, flitting between Oxbridge eccentrics, bright but troubled precocious schoolgirls coming of age, dominant dads (who turn out not to be their dads after all), neglected and troubled wives who have darker sides etc etc. Liked the heroine's take on Shakespearean tragedies and comedies.

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    18. Not a book to read sporadically as you have to stay with the complicated web of relationships. The sprawl of well-drawn characters give breadth and energise the plot in a rich academic and bohemian setting.

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    19. I wasn't in love with Juggling. It felt like an Angela Carter wannabe - very referential to Shakespeare and folktales but weighty where it should have been like a bubble. That said, I'd read Trapido again. It may just be that this is not the best book by her.

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    20. I didn't love this as much as 'hornplayer' it was too quirky in places and seemed as though it was trying too hard as a 'clever novel'. It got better and the last 50 pages were more readable than the rest of the book put together.

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    21. Read this one and Temples of Delight together as this is a sequel and as usual I liked them both. She is a very amusing writer. I preferred her later books and F and S but they had something. Together they averaged a 3.5

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    22. I didnt finish this book. I think its a fault of mine to be honest. I was on holiday and dipped in and out and couldnt get on with any of the characters. I very rarely ditch a book, sorry Barbara, I did this time!

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    23. Great,lively book that I wanted to read quite quickly. Colourful and poignant and no wasted words.

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    24. There's something about it that I quite can't put my finger onbut I loved it.

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    25. Beautifully written, her best book I'd say.

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    26. I enjoyed reading this book; her writing is really beautiful.

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    27. picked up as a freebie, and not a bad read, just not enough to get my full attention

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    28. Plot driven, theoretically and structurally interesting.

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    29. I liked the parallel to the "Shakespearean literature" as the tag suggests. But the writing style, punctuation and influx of characters in the beginning of the novel was too much for me.

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    30. I really enjoyed about 3/4's of this book, then the end was a complete let down I wouldn't recommend this book.

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