Hurricane Dancers: The First Caribbean Pirate Shipwreck

  • Title: Hurricane Dancers: The First Caribbean Pirate Shipwreck
  • Author: Margarita Engle
  • ISBN: 9780805092400
  • Page: 150
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Hurricane Dancers The First Caribbean Pirate Shipwreck Quebrado has been traded from pirate ship to ship in the Caribbean Sea for as long as he can remember The sailors he toils under call him el quebrado half islander half outsider a broken one Now the
    Quebrado has been traded from pirate ship to ship in the Caribbean Sea for as long as he can remember The sailors he toils under call him el quebrado half islander, half outsider, a broken one Now the pirate captain Bernardino de Talavera uses Quebrado as a translator to help navigate the worlds and words between his mother s Ta no Indian language and his father s SpaniQuebrado has been traded from pirate ship to ship in the Caribbean Sea for as long as he can remember The sailors he toils under call him el quebrado half islander, half outsider, a broken one Now the pirate captain Bernardino de Talavera uses Quebrado as a translator to help navigate the worlds and words between his mother s Ta no Indian language and his father s Spanish.But when a hurricane sinks the ship and most of its crew, it is Quebrado who escapes to safety He learns how to live on land again, among people who treat him well And it is he who must decide the fate of his former captors.

    • Hurricane Dancers: The First Caribbean Pirate Shipwreck by Margarita Engle
      150 Margarita Engle
    • thumbnail Title: Hurricane Dancers: The First Caribbean Pirate Shipwreck by Margarita Engle
      Posted by:Margarita Engle
      Published :2019-05-13T03:08:35+00:00

    About Margarita Engle


    1. Margarita Engle is a Cuban American poet, novelist, and journalist whose work has been published in many countries She lives with her husband in northern California.


    591 Comments


    1. 3.5An excellent introduction to poetry in verse. Poetry in verse is not my favourite style of as I prefer ones that have some sort of rhythm or rhyme, yet, for the story that Engle was trying to tell, verse was the only style that would fit. Hurricane Dancers tells the story of a young boy working as a slave on a ship whose name Quebrado meaning "broken one" as his heritage is mixed since he comes from a Native mother and a Spanish father. Alone since he was very young, Quebrado does not know wh [...]

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    2. A gorgeously written account of the first Carribean pirate shipwreck in the 1500s. Our hero, Quebrado, is a slave of Taino Indian and Spanish ancestry. He belongs to no one, a child of two worlds, of two languages. He is a slave on the famous Vernardino de Talavera's pirate ship, the first of its kind in the Caribbean Sea, and a very important hostage is on board with them, Alonso de Ojeda.The story is based on actual events, though Quebrado himself is fictional. After the shipwreck, Quedbrado i [...]

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    3. I read this book the very same day I received it in the mail. The cover is beautiful, but the content is even more beautiful. This book is destined to become a classic. This book should be shared over and over, and passed from generation to generation. I think that I will go read it again!

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    4. I read this short book on the way back from my family's house this Thanksgiving.I was surprised to find that it was told in verse--a quick flip-through would have shown me this, but this was one of the Free Book Day selections I had to grab before someone else did. Still, I was impressed with how much I was able to imagine and visualize with only a handful of words. Adjectives were used sparingly but with great effect. I think the subtitle actually sells the book short: I picked this up mostly b [...]

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    5. This book was told in different points of view and in a poetic kind of verse, which was pretty cool. It's a historical fiction story about The First Caribbean Pirate Shipwreck (as he title says) and was short and to the point which I loved and it told the short tale of a slave boy who tries to find some kind freedom for himself while dealing with his original captors. It was a fun read and kept me engaged. But it mentioned the boy's (Quebrado) parents a lot and I wish in the end I knew what happ [...]

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    6. The poetic narrative in this book is admirable but I was easily confused by all the different storylines and characters with strange names. No one talks to each other in this story. No action except what is presented through stream of consciousness by each individual character. Drawings of each character next to their name at the top of the page would've made it easier to follow. This becomes redundant, all these first person internal narratives presenting a thin tale of slavery, shipwreck, and [...]

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    7. After reading this book, I wondered why is it thatif we break up the text on a page it issuddenly considered poetry.Frankly, I just consider it easier to read! :) Ms. Engle's words are lovely, though, so I guess that is why it is "free verse" and not just a wise use of white space. However, I don't think this was the best format for this story. There was too much going on to be addressed in a short free-verse novel, and I didn't think the legend of the two lovers meshed well with the rest of the [...]

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    8. This book could be read by a girl or boy who are in the grade 6 to 10. This book has spanish character names. The book is young boy that is called Quebrado that means half islander and half outsider, a broken. He has traded from ship to ship in the Caribbean Sea from as long as he can remember. But now the pirate captain wants this young boy to boy the translator to help navigate the worlds and words between his mother's and father's languages. Then a hurricane sinks the ship and most of the cre [...]

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    9. This was a very unique poetry-style telling about the convergence of several very different characters' lives and how it changes the course of those lives forever. A pleasant read.

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    10. This was a really quick read. The poetry flowed perfectly and the characters well defined despite the shortness of the poem. I enjoyed it!

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    11. Margarita Engle’s Hurricane Dancers: The First Caribbean Pirate Shipwreck is a beautifully written novel in verse, similar in many ways to her earlier book The Surrender Tree. Here again, Engle brings to life a lesser known period of Caribbean history through three distinct but intertwined stories: that of Quebrado; Naridó and Caucubú; and Ojeda and Talavera. While many of us are familiar with the history of Christopher Columbus, other stories of the conquest and colonization of the Americas [...]

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    12. Margarita Engle's Hurricane Dancers: The First Caribbean Pirate Shipwreck is a beautifully written novel in verse, similar in many ways to her earlier book The Surrender Tree. Here again, Engle brings to life a lesser known period of Caribbean history through three distinct but intertwined stories: that of Quebrado; Naridó and Caucubú; and Ojeda and Talavera. While many of us are familiar with the history of Christopher Columbus, other stories of the conquest and colonization of the Americas a [...]

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    13. In the 1500s, pirates roamed the Caribbean Sea. Hurricane Dancers is the story of a historical pirate (Talavera), a conquistador (Ojeda), and three natives (Quebrado, Narido, and Caucubu). When a hurricane strikes, the ship wrecks on an island and the power structure is reversed. Well the pirate and the conquistador survive this strange new world of natives, jungles, and wild animals?This book was a bit challenging to follow at times. It is written in verse and every page is from a different poi [...]

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    14. There are many stories going on in this short book making me want to investigate more. Who is Bernardino de Talavera, and why did he become a pirate? Alonso de Ojeda traveled with Amerigo Vespucci, so how did that come about? Narido and Caucubu's relationship is legend, so did it end well? There are so many questions from reading this exciting story!

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    15. 3.5 stars out of 5.0 starsSuper quick read

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    16. This book is considered historical fiction and would best be explained as a poetry chapter book. A boy named Quebrado lives as a slave on pirate ships and doesn't remember what is was like to live a normal loved life. Sorrow is evident in many of the poems but they help make the story.

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    17. I first picked up this book because I was trying to find a book that was nonfiction. This book caught my eye because it was written in the format of short poems for different characters. I started reading, and I found that I actually really enjoyed it. it was about a young slave boy who is stuck on a pirate's ship until a shipwreck finally frees him. He then makes friends with the natives, but is later exiled and meets up with some of his friends who ran away for love. The pirate captain survive [...]

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    18. Margarita Engle’s Hurricane Dancers is historical accounting of real events but told in fictional style. There are only five characters in this story, but our writer gives each one distinctly unique and rich personal voice. Quebrado is the young ship’s slave who is both Taino Indian and of Spanish ancestry. Bernandino de Talavera is the first pirate of the Carribean. Alonso de Ojeda is a conquistador and the pirate’s prisoner, Narido is a young Ciboney Indian fisherman and Caucubu the youn [...]

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    19. "I have spent all my yearsaccepting sad truths." —Quebrado, Hurricane Dancers, P. 8 Glowing with the soft lyrical electricity of all her other novels in verse, Hurricane Dancers is gracefully poetic without sacrificing the clarity of the narrative, and filled with gems of wisdom and personal understanding that sparkle like hidden diamond shards half buried beneath the sandy beach. At the same time, this book is a rarity as a historical fiction novel for young-adults that goes all the way back [...]

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    20. The rain is falling, lightning is shearing across the sky. Over a hundred lives on a ship.Throwing the waves side-to-side as the Hurricane Dancers by Margarita Engle.The genre of the book is realistic fiction.This story is about a kid about 15, 14 years old it doesn't say his name in the story also he’s a slave in the ship. Obviously, he wants out of this horrible ship, but of course they won’t let him go, so this storm comes and turns into a hurricane and wrecks the ship.Then he gets washed [...]

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    21. I recently read Engle's wonderful picture book treatment of one of the earliest female scientists, Summer Birds: The Butterflies of Maria Merian, and when I saw she'd written a new book, I knew I had to get my hands on it. I was delighted and surprised to find it was a full-length novel in poetry format. Hurricane Dancers was completely different, but just as lovely. A variety of characters each takes turns telling the events of a famous shipwreck in the early days of European exploration of the [...]

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    22. Just learned that I won this via First Reads - and it's in verse format? I'm really looking forward to this. :)---Finished. It's a really quick read, and I enjoyed it. This follows the story of Quebrado, a slave boy working as a translator for the notorious Caribbean pirate Bernardino de Talavera. Also on board is conquistador Alonso de Ojeda, now a hostage. When a hurricane wrecks the ship, the characters become stranded on the island of Cuba and are forced to interact with the natives. Quebrad [...]

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    23. In order to understand the context of the book, you must understand the historical setting. This story is a fictionalized account of the first Caribbean Pirate shipwreck on Cuba in the 1500s. Most of the characters are actual people from history. The only fictional character is Quebrado. In the beginning of the novel, we meet Quebrado, a slave aboard Bernardino de Talavera’s ship—the first pirate ship of the Caribbean. At this point, Bernardino has captured Alonso de Ojeda and is holding him [...]

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    24. The book starts out with a brief historical setting and list of main characters. With a historical fiction book I like when the author includes some sort of background on which they drew their ideas from. I also found the cast list to be very helpful since there were five main characters, all with complicated names.The book was divided into six main sections: Wild Sea, Brave Earth, Hidden, The Sphere Court, The Sky Horse, Far Light, and told from five different perspectives.Quebrado, a young boy [...]

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    25. Reviewed at: teachmentortexts/2011/Summary: Quebrado finds himself a slave on a pirate ship after being traded around since his mother died and his father ran away. He doesn't even remember his own name, has just come to answer to el quebrado- half islander, half outsider- since his mother was from Cuba while his father was a sailor. He currently works for Bernardino de Talavera, the first pirate of the Caribbean Sea, who has recently captured Alonso de Ojeda, a brutal conquistador. However, Que [...]

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    26. Margarita Engle uses only poetry to tell her historical fiction story through the eyes of five completely different characters in her Pura Belpré Honor book, Hurricane Dancers: The First Caribbean Pirate Shipwreck. The story is mainly told from the perspective of a boy that is called Quebrado, when he is stolen to be used as a slave by Bernardino de Talavera because he can speak both Spanish and the language of the native Cubans. Engle explains that Talavera and another character, Alonso de Oje [...]

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    27. This 2012 Pura Belpré Honor Book tells the tale, in spare verse, of the historic crash of Spaniards against the shores of the native peoples of Hispaniola and Cuba in the early 1500s. As the cover handsomely illustrates, there is lush flora, untamed wind and sea, a courageous young boy, and yes, a pirate rushes into the middle of things. Hurricane Dancers provides a brief glimmer of lived experience from multiple perspectives as a young Ciboney Indian couple, two conquistadors, and a half-Taín [...]

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    28. I loved the lyrical prose poems and the feeling of tasting another culture and time. This story and it's telling were simply beautiful. This is a book I will read again, just to enjoy the sound and feel of the words.

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    29. Hurricane Dancers by Margarita EngleThis is not a glorified account of pirate life. It is not full of pirate lingo and cliche. Rather it's based on a real story of an early shipwreck, woven together with a legend of love passed down through generations of Cubans. Told in verse, the writing is spare but lovely. There are multiple narrators: the slave boy, a pirate captain, a fallen conquistador, a fisherman, a chieftain's daughter. Each page is headed with the name of the character, so it is not [...]

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    30. This is told in 5 voices. 5. While I appreciated having the names of the speakers listed over each page - so you not only knew who was talking, you could tell when that person would continue speaking for a few pages - 5 seems like a bit much in such a short book. I enjoyed learning about the very first Caribbean pirate, though we didn't get as much of his story as I had hoped. The author's note was very informative and it was cool to find out that most of the voices were real people. Including o [...]

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